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I have an experiment where my program picks up audio from my speakers (in decibels...sort of). The range is usually between about 0 and 20. I want to take that value and map it to a range between 0 and 1 so that I can scale an item in proportion to the volume coming through the speakers. So if the audio was 20 db, the scale would be 1. If the audio was 0 dB, the scale would be 0. How do I do this? I'm using Unity3D, if that gives anyone an idea for a helper function.

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closed as not a real question by Michael Durrant, casperOne Jun 29 '12 at 3:16

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Can't you divide by 20? –  Rob W Jun 27 '12 at 19:21
    
Well, I'd like a more dynamic way of doing it. –  mheavers Jun 27 '12 at 19:21
2  
Numbers can't dance. What do you mean by "dynamic"? Do you have any relevant code? –  Rob W Jun 27 '12 at 19:22
    
Yeah...bad question. I deserve that one... –  mheavers Jun 27 '12 at 19:37
    
I understand the question is not very well formulated but this might help other people trying to normalize data. Basically you need to take your dataset and divide every sample by the largest amplitude. Note that amplitude refers to both positive AND negative values. A simple example can be normalizing the swipe direccion of a carousel. E.g. var dir = (end.pos - start.pos)/Math.abs(end.pos - start.pos); This is just one sample, so we divide it by itself. We want to keep + and - information so thats why we abs(). This gives always dir = 1 or -1. Just my two cents –  Juank Nov 3 at 17:31

2 Answers 2

Divide it by 20, if that is truly the maximum.

var scale = function(db) {
   return db/20;
}

or

    var scale = function(db) {
     if (db > 0)
         {

         return db/20;

         }
     else if (db < 0)
        {

        return "db is out of range"; # or do something

        }
     else 
        {
      return "something else";

        }

  }
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I guess the problem is that the equation for getting the output volume is really approximate. Sometimes the dB value goes into the negatives, in which case simply dividing wouldn't work. –  mheavers Jun 27 '12 at 19:26
    
Then you just test for the range of db before you choose how you normalize the return value. –  holaSenor Jun 27 '12 at 19:27

If you don't want to uniformly squash the distribution by division, you could use an appropriate logarithm or exponential. To use the logarithm, shift your data so that the smallest value is 1, then take the log (any base) and use division to scale that down. This will give more weight to values at the lower end, and diminishing returns on greater values.

Using an exponential might be more appropriate for decibels, since they are already a logarithmic scale. Simply raise some constant to each value, and then divide by the greatest result. This will do the opposite of the logarithmic scaling; big numbers will widen the gap between each other while smaller numbers will get closer together.

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