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Is it executed / read-by-the-server every time a page on the site is loaded?

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The web.config is loaded into memory when the Application is created. This is typically the first request to a page/resource in the application. IIS (ASP.NET) monitors the web.config for changes and will restart your Application if a change is made.

If your question is actually "will web.config settings automatically update when the file is changed?" The answer is YES HOWEVER your Application will be restarted which can result in unexpected behavior including session and data loss.

Some of the above statements are not always true and I recommend reading this: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms178685.aspx

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To avoid session loss, use the ASP.NET Session State Service (avoids SQL Server overhead, at least). –  jonnyGold Jun 27 '12 at 19:31
    
Thanks. But why, then, does the file have to remain there? Only for restarts? –  ispiro Jun 27 '12 at 19:36
    
I believe ASP.NET places a File System Watcher on that file so when changes are detected the Configuration cache (at that level in the hierarchy) is flushed and reloaded. If you delete the file my guess is the watcher will detect this and reload empty configuration. I have not tested this but I believe you will get null values for missing configuration (from ConfigurationManager). –  kingdango Jun 27 '12 at 19:41
    
BTW - if you are trying to manage frequently changing settings you can perhaps more easily handle this by storing them in a database and loading them either on-change or with every new request. –  kingdango Jun 27 '12 at 19:43
    
@kingdango Thanks. –  ispiro Jun 27 '12 at 19:43

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