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Is uninitialized data behavior well specified?

I tried the following code

#include<stdio.h>
void main()
{
int i; \
printf('%d',i);
}

The result gave garbage value in VC++, while same in tc was zero. What will be the correct value? Will an uninitialized variable by default have value of zero? or it will contain garbage value?

Next is on the same

#include<stdio.h> 
void main()
{
int i,j,num;
j=(num>0?0:num*num);
printf("\n%d",j);
}

What will be the output of the code above?

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marked as duplicate by Ben Voigt, R. Martinho Fernandes, Etienne de Martel, Praetorian, Sam DeHaan Jun 27 '12 at 19:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
It's undefined. That's why it's garbage. In C, you gotta initialize things yourself. –  Mike Dunlavey Jun 27 '12 at 19:31
2  
Which language? C or C? Oh wait... –  Etienne de Martel Jun 27 '12 at 19:31
1  
1  
The output your code gave me: i48.servimg.com/u/f48/11/68/36/17/nasal_10.png :-O –  jrok Jun 27 '12 at 19:45
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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Technically, the value of an uninitialized non static local variable is Indeterminate[Ref 1].
In short it can be anything. Accessing such a uninitialized variable leads to an Undefined Behavior.[Ref 2]

[Ref 1]
C99 section 6.7.8 Initialization:

If an object that has automatic storage duration is not initialized explicitly, its value is indeterminate.

[Ref 2]

C99 section 3.18 Undefined behavior:

behavior, upon use of a nonportable or erroneous program construct, of erroneous data, or of indeterminately valued objects, for which this International Standard imposes no requirements.

Note: Emphasis mine.

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OP is asking about C (C89?), not C++03. –  keelerjr12 Jun 27 '12 at 19:39
1  
@keelerjr12: It was retagged later.Modified for C99. –  Alok Save Jun 27 '12 at 19:40
2  
Why do you answer to such an obvious dupe? I thought better of you. –  sbi Jun 27 '12 at 19:59
1  
@sbi: I have always known the first two statements of my answer.I didn't really know exactly which part of the C standard explicitly says them(I know precisely where C++ standard states so).I was keen on finding the detail for C standard(Yes,I am not well versed in C).If you see my answer edits i took a lot of time to find the exact details where the C standard states this.I edited to detail after this Q was closed.It was more of learning a experience myself rather than just providing an answer.And I do admit I am selfish enough to want to learn things rather than just give answers. –  Alok Save Jun 27 '12 at 20:04
    
@Als: Why do you answer to such an obvious dupe? I thought better of you. –  sbi Jun 27 '12 at 20:15
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Accessing an unitialized variable is undefined behavior in both C and C++, so reading any value is possible.

It is also possible that your program crashes: once you get into undefined behavior territory, all bets are off1.


1 I have never seen a program crashing over accessing an uninitalized variable, unless it's a pointer.

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For implementations that include trap representations, reading an uninitialized object of any type other than unsigned char (including int) may trigger a trap. –  Alok Save Jun 27 '12 at 20:00
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It's indeterminate. The compiler can do what it wants.

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2  
To be pedantic; its value is indeterminate; using it results in undefined behavior. –  Ed S. Jun 27 '12 at 19:32
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The value is indeterminate; using the variable before initialization results in undefined behavior.

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It's undefined. It might be different between different compilers, different operating systems, different runs of the program, anything. It might not even be a particular value: the compiler is allowed to do whatever it likes to this code, because the effect isn't defined. It might choose to optimize away your whole program. It might even choose to replace your program with one that installers a keylogger and steals all of your online banking login details.

If you want to know the value, the only way is to set it.

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As others have noted, the value can be anything.

This sometimes leads to hard-to-find bugs, e.g. because you happen to get one value in a debug build and get a different value in a release build, or the initial value that you get depends on previous program execution.

Lesson: ALWAYS initialize variables. There's a reason that C# defines values for fields and requires initialization for local variables.

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