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I think that I'm probably not writing lazily instantiated methods/attributes in the most ruby way. Take this method as an example:

def tax
  @tax ||= Proc.new do
    if flat_tax > commission_plan.tax_max
      return commission_plan.tax_max
    end if commission_plan.tax_max
    if flat_tax < commission_plan.tax_min
      return commission_plan.tax_min
    end if commission_plan.tax_min
    flat_tax
  end.call
end

Is there a more ruby-like way to refactor this method?

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... Why are you creating an anonymous function there? –  YuriAlbuquerque Jun 27 '12 at 20:15
2  
I'm slightly surprised that if foo bar end if baz is valid Ruby. But please, don't write code like this! –  Andrew Grimm Jun 27 '12 at 22:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
def tax
  @tax ||= calc_tax
end

private

def calc_tax
  min, max = commission_plan.tax_min, commission_plan.tax_max
  if (min..max).include? flat_tax
    flat_tax
  else
    flat_tax > max ? max : min
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
I almost wrote a solution that avoided the chained conditionals... but your solution doesn't handle the nil checking that his original had. Though good call on making the calc_tax private. –  Ryan Sandridge Jun 27 '12 at 20:40
    
@RyanSandridge Good eye... guess my brain didn't parse that bit. +1 to you –  Abe Voelker Jun 27 '12 at 20:46
    
Nice answer. I just changed the assignment statement to set min and max to flat_tax if nil. Works perfectly and much more ruby-like. –  barelyknown Jun 27 '12 at 20:54
    
+1. This code is amazingly beautiful. I didn't know we could use sequences with floats. –  YuriAlbuquerque Jun 27 '12 at 21:04

If you don't want to add a dependency to an external library, you can easily add your own "memoize" helper. Something along the lines of:

class Class
  def memoize(method)
    original_method = instance_method(method)
    instance_var = "@__#{method}__".to_sym
    define_method(method) do |*a,&b|
      cached = instance_variable_get(instance_var)
      unless cached
        cached = old_method.bind(self).call(*a,&b)
        instance_variable_set(instance_var, cached)
      end
      cached
    end
  end
end

And then usage would be like:

def tax
  # expensive calculation here
end
memoize :tax

If you don't like this memoize interface, you can change it to whatever you like. This is Ruby, baby! The language which you can twist, bend, and stretch like bubble gum. Maybe an interface like this would be nice:

def_memoized :tax do
  # expensive calculation here
end

I like to put my per-project extensions to core Ruby in a file called lib/core_extensions.rb. This is the kind of thing that would go in there.

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Nice answer. I kept the other answer because it was more direct, but this was helpful. –  barelyknown Jun 28 '12 at 15:43

What you are asking about it called Memoization. As Yuri suggests, it is awkward that you are using a Proc for this.

Here is my quick refactoring. I'd probably still refactor this further... but it is a simple refactoring which is more Ruby-ish.

def tax
  @tax ||= calculate_tax
end

def calculate_tax
  if commission_plan.tax_max && flat_tax > commission_plan.tax_max
    commission_plan.tax_max
  elsif commission_plan.tax_min && flat_tax < commission_plan.tax_min
    commission_plan.tax_min
  else 
    flat_tax
  end
end

Also, if you don't mind including some external dependencies, check out ActiveSupport::Memoizable. And here is an article that talks about memoization.

share|improve this answer

I don't understand why you are creating this anonymous function. It's... redundant. This is a much better and cleaner code:

def tax
    return commission_plan.tax_max if commission_plan.tax_max &&
        flat_tax > commission_plan.tax_max
    return commission_plan.tax_min if commission_plan.tax_min &&
        flat_tax > commission_plan.tax_min
    return flat_tax
end

There are other ways of implementing it, but this is a great improving compared to what you have there.

share|improve this answer
    
Let's assume that the calculation is more expensive than this example and that I'd want to store the result in the instance variable @tax once it's been calculated once. In that case, what should I set the ||= to. –  barelyknown Jun 27 '12 at 20:28

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