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I am working on a project with CSS and HTML based bar representations of percentage values. The code looks like this:

HTML:

<div class="chart">
  <div class="bar" style="width:43%"></div>
</div>

CSS:

.chart {
  background-color: #DADADA;
  height: 2px;
  position: relative;
}

.chart .bar {
    background-color: #3D98C6;
    height: 100%;
}

What I would like to do is to start the bar width at 0% on page load, and then animate it to the inline value. I want the value to be inline so that our backend developers can have Ruby on Rails just output a percentage in the view. I know that I can do this with transitions, and I currently am doing that like this:

CSS:

.chart .bar {
  -moz-transition: width 1.25s linear;
  -webkit-transition: width 1.25s linear;
  -ms-transition: width 1.25s linear;
  -o-transition: width 1.25s linear;
  transition: width 1.25s linear;
}

body.jquery.csstransitions:not(.loaded) .chart-container .chart .bar {
  width: 0% !important;
}

JavaScript:

$(function() {
  $('body').addClass('jquery');

  // Way down in the code

  $('body').addClass('loaded');
});

This says that while the user has JavaScript supported, their browser supports CSS transitions, and the class of "loaded" has not yet been added to the body, all bars have a width of 0%. Once .loaded is added with jQuery, the bars all transition to the inline value.

The problem I have with this method is that there's a slim chance that a user will have JavaScript enabled and the "jquery" and "csstransitions" classes will be added, but that it will break for some reason before it gets to the code that adds class .loaded. This would cause the bars to all appear with 0% width. This project I work on has a lot of hands on it, and there's a chance that the JavaScript could break at just the right place to cause our users to see broken charts. If I could instead use CSS keyframe animations to animate from 0% width to the inline width, then I could take JavaScript out of the equation, and know that the code would either animate the bars, or just load them without the animation.

Is there any way to animate/transition a width on page load, without relying on JavaScript?

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Maybe you could insert a transition-enabler stylesheet just before the closing </body> tag, if you dare :) –  biziclop Jun 27 '12 at 20:40

1 Answer 1

It looks like my question was actually pretty easy to answer after all. I had never used CSS keyframe animations before, and didn't realize that they basically apply styles conditionally based on time, and then animate between them. What this means is that by applying no style for a certain keyframe, the next thing in line to apply styles will just get animated to in place of the empty styles. This means that I can do this:

HTML:

<div class="chart">
  <div class="bar" style="width:43%;"></div>
</div>

CSS:

@-moz-keyframes animate-bar {
    0%   { width: 0%; }
}

@-webkit-keyframes animate-bar {
    0%   { width: 0%; }
}

@-ms-keyframes animate-bar {
    0%   { width: 0%; }
}

@-o-keyframes animate-bar {
    0%   { width: 0%; }
}

@-keyframes animate-bar {
    0%   { width: 0%; }
}

.chart {
  background-color: #DADADA;
  height: 2px;
  position: relative;
}

.chart .bar {
  background-color: #3D98C6;
  height: 100%;
  -moz-animation: animate-bar 1.25s 1 linear;
  -webkit-animation: animate-bar 1.25s 1 linear;
  -ms-animation: animate-bar 1.25s 1 linear;
  -o-animation: animate-bar 1.25s 1 linear;
  animation: animate-bar 1.25s 1 linear;
}

And the start animation of 0% will just animate to the inline style, because having no finish style means that the finish style is equivalent to whatever overwrites that style.

Edit:

I've created a JS Fiddle to demonstrate this to future visitors.

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