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In .cmd files on windows I do:

SET JARS=^
./lib/apache-mime4j-0.6.jar;^
./lib/apache-mime4j-0.6.jar;^
./lib/bsh-1.3.0.jar;^
./lib/cglib-nodep-2.1_3.jar;^
./lib/commons-codec-1.6.jar;^
./lib/commons-collections-3.2.1.jar;^
./lib/commons-exec-1.1.jar;^
./lib/commons-io-2.0.1.jar;^
./lib/commons-io-2.3.jar;

How can I do such multiline assignment in shell?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The question implicitly requests single line output, as I will show.

test.bat

@SET JARS=^
./lib/apache-mime4j-0.6.jar;^
./lib/apache-mime4j-0.6.jar;^
./lib/bsh-1.3.0.jar;^
./lib/cglib-nodep-2.1_3.jar;^
./lib/commons-codec-1.6.jar;^
./lib/commons-collections-3.2.1.jar;^
./lib/commons-exec-1.1.jar;^
./lib/commons-io-2.0.1.jar;^
./lib/commons-io-2.3.jar;
@echo %JARS%

Output

c:\home\Steven\Desktop>test.bat
./lib/apache-mime4j-0.6.jar;./lib/apache-mime4j-0.6.jar;./lib/bsh-1.3.0.jar;./li
b/cglib-nodep-2.1_3.jar;./lib/commons-codec-1.6.jar;./lib/commons-collections-3.
2.1.jar;./lib/commons-exec-1.1.jar;./lib/commons-io-2.0.1.jar;./lib/commons-io-2
.3.jar;

test.sh

JARS=\
'./lib/apache-mime4j-0.6.jar;'\
'./lib/apache-mime4j-0.6.jar;'\
'./lib/bsh-1.3.0.jar;'\
'./lib/cglib-nodep-2.1_3.jar;'\
'./lib/commons-codec-1.6.jar;'\
'./lib/commons-collections-3.2.1.jar;'\
'./lib/commons-exec-1.1.jar;'\
'./lib/commons-io-2.0.1.jar;'\
'./lib/commons-io-2.3.jar;'
echo "$JARS"

Output

$ ./test.sh
./lib/apache-mime4j-0.6.jar;./lib/apache-mime4j-0.6.jar;./lib/bsh-1.3.0.jar;./li
b/cglib-nodep-2.1_3.jar;./lib/commons-codec-1.6.jar;./lib/commons-collections-3.
2.1.jar;./lib/commons-exec-1.1.jar;./lib/commons-io-2.0.1.jar;./lib/commons-io-2
.3.jar;
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@GordonDavisson, ah yes. Didn't pay attention to the semicolon. It should just need quotation on every element. –  Shahbaz Jun 27 '12 at 22:16

So many ways to skin this cat.

JARS='
./lib/apache-mime4j-0.6.jar;
./lib/apache-mime4j-0.6.jar;
./lib/bsh-1.3.0.jar;
./lib/cglib-nodep-2.1_3.jar;
./lib/commons-codec-1.6.jar;
./lib/commons-collections-3.2.1.jar;
./lib/commons-exec-1.1.jar;
./lib/commons-io-2.0.1.jar;
./lib/commons-io-2.3.jar;
'

This gets you multiline input in a variable, per your question.

But if you're planning to USE these files in a shell script, you need to tell us how, so that we can come up with appropriate answers, rather than making us guess. For use in a shell script, files need to be delimited by something useful.

You asked, "How can I do such multiline assignment in shell", but the assignment in your example is actually a SINGLE line, with the ^ at the end of each input line negating the following newline (not escaping it, as another answer suggested).

My solution in this answer is multiline, but you'll need to explain more about what you need this for in order to determine what will be useful.

For example, if you need to step through a list of files that will be processed with the jar command, you might want to have something like:

#!/bin/sh

JARS='
./lib/apache-mime4j-0.6.jar
./lib/bsh-1.3.0.jar
...
'

set $JARS
for jarfile in "$@"; do
  jar xf "$jarfile" ...
done
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1  
If I say echo $JARS, then result string is space-separated. –  stiv Jun 27 '12 at 21:06
3  
Yes. And if you say echo "$JARS", you get the output formatted the way you specified it. You should pay close attention to how quotes are used in Bash. They are extremely important. –  ghoti Jun 27 '12 at 21:26
    
Should I put new line character in the end of each string ? –  Fedir Jun 18 '13 at 21:00
    
@Fedir - if that's what you want, then sure. If you want fine-grained control over what gets printed, use printf instead of echo. If you have a use case that's different from the OP's, you might want to pose it as its own question. –  ghoti Jun 19 '13 at 11:32

or alternatively

SOMEVAR=$( cat <<EOF
value1
value2
value3
value4
value5
EOF
)
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This gives me: ./parser.sh: line 1: unexpected EOF while looking for matching `)' ./parser.sh: line 56: syntax error: unexpected end of file –  stiv Jun 27 '12 at 20:57
    
cannot really see why it doesn't work for you.. hmmm –  matcheek Jun 27 '12 at 21:03
    
Because the closing EOF can't be indented. edit you got it already. :) –  ormaaj Jun 27 '12 at 21:08
    
it must have been a combination of markdown and whitespaces. Now corrected. –  matcheek Jun 27 '12 at 21:11

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