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I have been recently using Hadoop. I wanted to know if there is any API or Monitoring Tool that can be used to collect real-time statistics regarding tasks and HDFS (like data movement among slaves/master).

I can only find this information from log files but I want this information in real-time (not do post analysis).

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3 Answers 3

Ganglia and Nagios can be integrated with Hadoop to monitor Hadoop cluster. Check these tutorials (1 and 2) to know more about Ganglia and Nagios.

Search for a combination of Ganglia/Nagios and Hadoop and you will get a lot of tutorials. Here is a brief introduction.

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You can either scrape the information from the Jobtracker web UI (for tasks) or write a small Java program using the API's to access the JobTracker and poll it to grab the information. In terms of HDFS events, you'll need to tail & parse the log file, or possibly scrape some of the information from the Namenode web UI. Possibly use JMX to get metrics from each of the datanodes, depending on what you are after.

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This is one of the approach. Better is to integrate Hadoop with Ganglia and Nagios. –  Praveen Sripati Jun 28 '12 at 3:55

If you're using Yarn, there's a rest API that I'd use before screen scraping the job tracker, Hadoop YARN - Introduction to the web services REST API's. If you're using 1.3, I don't know of anything. There is a bug opened on Apache's Jira asking for said feature, but it's marked as resolved in MRv2, so I wouldn't expect any progress towards it.

Regarding Ganglia/Nagios, the pair doesn't track job flow, it tracks the health of the system. If it has the capability to do job tracking buried among its innards, I haven't found it.

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