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I have two templated structures that each contain a const static member variable. The initialization of one of these member variables depends on the second. I would therefore like to be able to guarantee that the second is initialized before the first. Here's a simplified example:

dependency.hpp:

template<typename T, T> struct value { };

template <typename T>
struct Dependency {
  Dependency() {}
  Dependency(T v) : var(v) {}
  const static Dependency staticVar;
  T var;
};

template <typename T>
const Dependency<T> Dependency<T>::staticVar = Dependency<T>(1.5);

testStruct.hpp:

#include "dependency.hpp"

//template class Dependency<double>; [1]
//template class Dependency<float>;  [2]

template <typename T>
struct TestStruct {
  TestStruct(Dependency<T> v) : var(v.var) {}

  const static TestStruct staticVar;
  T var;
};

template <typename T>
const TestStruct<T> TestStruct<T>::staticVar = TestStruct<T>(Dependency<T>(Dependency<T>::staticVar));

test.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include "testStruct.hpp"

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  cout << "TestStruct<d> " << TestStruct<double>::staticVar.var << endl;
  cout << "Dependency<d> " << Dependency<double>::staticVar.var << endl;

  cout << endl;

  cout << "Dependency<f> " << Dependency<float>::staticVar.var << endl; // [3]
  cout << "TestStruct<f> " << TestStruct<float>::staticVar.var << endl;

  return 0;
};

The output of main is

TestStruct<d> 0
Dependency<d> 1.5

Dependency<f> 1.5
TestStruct<f> 1.5

That is, the TestStruct<T>'s staticVar gets correctly initialized if Dependency has already been instantiated for type T, but it remains at 0 otherwise, since Dependency<T>::staticVar hasn't yet been initialized. Uncommenting [1] and [2] solves the problem for types float and double (i.e., everything outputs 1.5, even with [3] commented), but I would prefer if possible not to have to list all possible types or to instantiate the template for those types in code that does not use them. I would like to be able to put something in TestStruct<T> (or testStruct.hpp) to guarantee that Dependency has been instantiated for that type without having to specify what types T may be.

I have seen C++ Static member initalization (template fun inside) and How to force a static member to be initialized?. The first explains the situation well, but does not propose a solution for a problem like mine. The second has two solutions, but neither appears to work in GCC 4.2.1 (or I applied it incorrectly...).

Are there any other tricks or work-arounds I should try, or am I stuck with explicit instantiation?

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, thought it's a dupe. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 27 '12 at 21:16
    
This is a good read and might address your problem. –  cdhowie Jun 27 '12 at 21:18
    
@cdhowie Replacing the static variables with static functions requires (minor) changes to the interface, which I would prefer not to make if possible, since there is existing code that uses these structures. It may be the best option though. –  surtur Jun 27 '12 at 21:45
    
Is upgrading the compiler out of the question? –  jxh Jun 28 '12 at 1:00
    
@surtur Yeah, it does change the interface, which sucks. But it is the only option that gives you explicit control over when things get constructed. –  cdhowie Jun 28 '12 at 18:07
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1 Answer

As suggested by cdhowie, you can use a static method to ensure initialization order between TestStruct and Dependency. If you are really concerned about maintaining the appearance of a static variable rather than a static method, you can use a preprocessor macro to convert the original static variable name into the new static method call.

#define staticVar staticMethod()

template <typename T>
struct Dependency {
  Dependency() {}
  Dependency(T v) : var(v) {}
  static const Dependency & staticMethod () {
      static const Dependency staticMethodVar(1.5);
      return staticMethodVar;
  }
  T var;
};

template <typename T>
struct TestStruct {
  TestStruct(Dependency<T> v) : var(v.var) {}
  static const TestStruct & staticMethod () {
      static const TestStruct staticMethodVar(Dependency<T>::staticVar);
      return staticMethodVar;
  }
  T var;
};

Then, code like this will still work:

std::cout << "TestStruct<d> " << TestStruct<double>::staticVar.var << std::endl;
std::cout << "Dependency<d> " << Dependency<double>::staticVar.var << std::endl;
share|improve this answer
    
While the macro approach is clever, it is not something I would feel comfortable doing in production code and therefore I cannot upvote this answer. –  cdhowie Jun 28 '12 at 18:08
    
@cdhowie: My C programming colleagues are much more comfortable with macro renaming than with operator overloading, and so it goes. –  jxh Jun 28 '12 at 19:51
1  
I agree this is a clever trick, but I don't like this sort of obfuscation, and I'm nervous about unintended side-effects of such a macro that could take place far from the header from which it's originally included. –  surtur Jul 1 '12 at 20:43
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