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OK, so here is the situation. I've got a FlexCollection<T> class, which purpose is to hold a list of some specialization of FlexItem, therefore:

public class FlexCollection<T> where T : FlexItem, new()
{
    public void Add(T item) { ... }
    ...
}

FlexItem is not generic class itself. What I wanted to achieve is ability to hold in FlexItem's field a reference to the collection that contains the object. Unfortunately in C# it is not possible to hold reference to "any" specialization of template class (as in Java). At first I tried to use non-generic interface IFlexCollection but it actually forced me to implement each method twice, i.e.:

public class FlexCollection<T> : IFlexCollection where T : FlexItem, new()
{
    public void Add(T item) { ... } // to use in generic calls
    public void Add(object item) { ... } // to use for calls from within FlexItem
    ...
}

Then I had found out that I could make FlexItem a generic class itself! Then a specialization can hold a reference to collection of objects of this specialization (which is quite logical). Therefore:

public class FlexItem<T> where T : FlexItem<T>, new()
{
    public FlexCollection<T> ReferenceToParentCollection;
    ...
}

public class FlexCollection<T> where T : FlexItem<T>, new()
{
    public void Add(T item) { ... } 
    ...
}

Now i can declare some FlexItem<T> specialization and corresponding collection:

public class BasicItem : FlexItem<BasicItem> { public int A; }
public class BasicCollection : FlexCollection<BasicItem> { };

The problem arises when I try to extend those classes to hold additional fields. I.e. I wanted an ExtendedItem class which holds field B in addition to field A:

public class ExtendedItem : BasicItem { public int B; }
public class ExtendedCollection : FlexCollection<ExtendedItem> { };

And the thing is that ExtendedItem is a subclass of FlexItem<BasicItem> and not FlexItem<ExtendedItem>. Therefore is is impossible to declare ExtendedCollection as above. This causes a compilation error:

The type 'Demo.ExtendedItem' must be convertible to
'Demo.FlexItem<Demo.ExtendedItem>' in order to use it as parameter 'T'
in the generic type or method 'Demo.BasicCollection<T>'

Is there any way to avoid such type collision?

share|improve this question
    
You need to use a covariant / contravariant interface somewhere. Unfortunately, which to use and where depends on what you need the reference to the parent collection for. (That said, my preferred solution to this sort of problem is "use less generic constraints". Are BasicCollection and ExtendedCollection really necessary in your design?) –  millimoose Jun 27 '12 at 21:17
    
Unfortunately C# < 4.0 here. :-( Yes, I need both BasicCollection and ExtendedCollection as they behave differently in some situations. Moreover I need ExtendedItem to inherit from BasicItem (i.e. I can't use common abstract ancestor declaring A) as there are situations when I need to assign EI to BI reference. I also tried using "less generic constraints" but it made me impossible to set Parent property of FlexItem from within FlexCollection as I don't know the underlaing type, and still don't know how to declare reference to parent then. :-) Thank you anyway. :-) –  Kuba Wyrostek Jun 27 '12 at 21:46
    
Making FlexItem an interface that BasicItem and ExtendedItem both implement could still help. –  millimoose Jun 27 '12 at 21:52
    
Why are you wanting to define BasicCollection and ExtendedCollection? You can store ExtendedItem in a FlexCollection<FlexItem> instance, because ExtendedItem inherits from FlexItem. If you want to add functionality to ExtendedCollection that should only take an ExtendedItem as a parameter, then specify it in the method. –  Michael Jun 28 '12 at 1:34
    
There are various reasons for this. I.e. both BasicCollection and ExtendedCollection are members of xml-serialized objects. Therefore I want serialized BasicCollection to include only A no matter that the underlaying object is actually ExtendedItem (and therefore contains both A and B). Doing as you said would require me to do a lot of manual type-casting and type-checking and this is what I wanted to avoid using generic types. :-) –  Kuba Wyrostek Jun 28 '12 at 7:32

3 Answers 3

Not sure what is the purpose (usage) of your code, but it seems to me that you are trying to base something on a generics solution and later on 'get rid of' the generic data about some types - this is not possible in C#. If you choose to pursue a generics approach you should always keep the info of the base of the generic types:

    public class FlexItem<T> where T : FlexItem<T>, new()
    {
        public FlexCollection<T> ReferenceToParentCollection;
    }

    public class FlexCollection<T> where T : FlexItem<T>, new()
    {
        public void Add(T item)
        {
        }
    }

    public class BasicItem<T> : FlexItem<BasicItem<T>>
    {
        public int A;
    }

    public class BasicCollection<T> : FlexCollection<BasicItem<T>>
    {
    }

    public class ExtendedItem<T> : BasicItem<T>
    {
        public int B;
    }

    public class ExtendedCollection<T> : FlexCollection<T> where T: FlexItem<T>, new()
    {
    }
share|improve this answer

There are 2 ways you can resolve this:

You can use the base Polymorphic Collection and not inherit the base class collection:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        BasicCollection extendedCollection = new BasicCollection();
        extendedCollection.Add(new ExtendedItem { A = 1, B = 2});
        extendedCollection.Add(new BasicItem { A = 3 });
        extendedCollection.Add(new ExtendedItem { A = 4, B = 5});

        foreach (BasicItem item in extendedCollection)
        {
            switch(item.GetType().Name)
            {
                case "BasicItem":
                    Console.Out.WriteLine(string.Format("Found BasicItem: A={0}", item.A));
                    break;
                case "ExtendedItem":
                    ExtendedItem extendedItem = item as ExtendedItem;
                    Console.Out.WriteLine(string.Format("Found ExtendedItem: A={0} B={1}", extendedItem.A, extendedItem.B));
                    break;
            }
        }
    }
}

public class FlexItem<T> where T : FlexItem<T>, new()
{
    public FlexCollection<BasicItem> ReferenceToParentCollection;
}

public class FlexCollection<T> where T : FlexItem<T>, new()
{
    public void Add(T item) { } 
}
public class BasicItem : FlexItem<BasicItem> { public int A; }
public class ExtendedItem : BasicItem { public int B; }
public class BasicCollection : FlexCollection<BasicItem>
{
    Collection<BasicItem> items = new Collection<BasicItem>();
    public void Add(BasicItem item)
    {
        item.ReferenceToParentCollection = this;
        items.Add(item);
    }
    public void Remove(BasicItem item)
    {
        item.ReferenceToParentCollection = null;
        items.Remove(item);
    }
    public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        return items.GetEnumerator();
    }

}

Or you can box the collection class reference and unbox it when you need it since you know the type of the child object?

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ExtendedCollection extendedCollection = new ExtendedCollection();
        extendedCollection.Add(new ExtendedItem { A = 1, B = 2, ReferenceToParentCollection = extendedCollection });
        extendedCollection.Add(new ExtendedItem { A = 3, B = 3, ReferenceToParentCollection = extendedCollection });
        foreach (ExtendedItem item in extendedCollection)
        {
            (item.ReferenceToParentCollection as ExtendedCollection) ...
        }
    }
}


public class FlexItem<T> where T : FlexItem<T>, new()
{
    public object ReferenceToParentCollection;
}

public class FlexCollection<T> where T : FlexItem<T>, new()
{
    public void Add(T item) { } 
}

public class BasicItem : FlexItem<BasicItem> { public int A; }
public class BasicCollection : FlexCollection<BasicItem> { };
public class ExtendedItem : BasicItem { public int B; }
public class ExtendedCollection : FlexCollection<ExtendedItem> { };
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Ryan, but I can't go with any of these solutions. There are many differences in implementations between different collections (sometimes different constructors, some are populated from database some are not, some inherit from other, some not) that it would actually force me to write totally undreadable code if I had to check type of collection item in every method of collection. –  Kuba Wyrostek Jun 29 '12 at 19:23
    
As for the second solutions - I believe it is wrong. When calling from Main() - OK, but from FlexItem<T>'s point of view - I wouldn't know to what type to cast this "ReferenceToParentCollectionTo" to, in order to call any method on it. So interface reference is still better. Please take a look at "event" proposal posted here. –  Kuba Wyrostek Jun 29 '12 at 19:26

OK, i've decided to give C# events a try. This way I actually do not need FlexItem to hold a reference to owning FlexCollection. I simply raise an event i.e. "IAmBeingRemoved" and FlexCollection's code if performing corresponding actions. Code logic is even better encapsulated then. I just hope I will not run into any performance issues or other generic-based suprises. :-) I am posting it so that maybe somebody finds it a good solution for their own problem.

share|improve this answer
    
This is actually a good idea –  Alex Jun 28 '12 at 12:53
    
And after a brief testing it seems so. I still need to cast T to FlexItem or FlexItem to T sometimes but it is much more intuitive now. –  Kuba Wyrostek Jun 29 '12 at 14:27
    
This is what I was going to recommend. It's usually a better design if you don't have circular dependencies. The items shouldn't have to know that they are in a collection - any collection-aware methods should be on the collection, not the item. –  default.kramer Jun 29 '12 at 19:09

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