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In this a and "v1" does not come out to be equal...although the content is same..can someone help in suggesting a way such that a comes out to be equal to "v1"

int main()
{
    stringstream s;
    string a;
    char *c="v1";
    s<<c;
    a=s.str();
    cout<<a;
    int i=strcmp(a, "v1");
    cout<<"i="<<i;
}

On comparing a and "v1" do not come out to be equal...please suggest some way such that i may make a to be equal to "v1"...the end goal is to make a to be equal to "v1".

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What does the program output? –  Linuxios Jun 27 '12 at 22:33
1  
strcmp(a, "v1") actually compiles? –  James McNellis Jun 27 '12 at 22:34
2  
char *c="v1"; should be const char *c="v1"; –  John Dibling Jun 27 '12 at 22:38
    
I see no strcmp here, but I've added one to my answer. –  John Dibling Jun 27 '12 at 22:47
    
@user1355603: You've edited your question to get rid of the strcmp, which completely changes the nature of your question and invalidates several of the answers you've now received. Please don't do that. By all means edit your post to add clarifications, etc. –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 27 '12 at 22:49
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Because strcmp returns 0 when the inputs match.

(Incidentally, I assume that your actual code is strcmp(a.c_str(), "v1"), because otherwise it wouldn't have compiled.)

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That i know...but i want string a to be equal to "v1"....my end goal is to somehow make a to be equal to v1 –  user1355603 Jun 27 '12 at 22:37
    
@user1355603: See e.g. ideone.com/RnYI5. If that is not what you expect, please clarify! –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 27 '12 at 22:38
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strcmp requires a char *, where as a is of type std::string.

The std::string class provides a method that returns a format compatible with strcmp.
Try: int i = strcmp(a.c_str(), "v1");

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They are the same, at least lexically. Note that strcmp returns 0 when the strings are the same, which is not the same as true.

int main()
{
    stringstream s;
    string a;
    const char *c="v1";
    s<<c;
    a=s.str();
    cout << a << "\t" << c;
    cout << endl;
    cout << boolalpha << (a == c) << endl;
    cout << boolalpha << (!strcmp(c, a.c_str())) << endl;
}

Output:

v1      v1
true
true
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