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I am studying for java certification, and I see this example from Mughal's book:

public class Smiley extends Thread
{
@Override
public void run()
{ 
    while(true)
    { 
        synchronized(this)
        {
            try
            { 
                System.out.print(":"); 
                Thread.sleep(100); 
                System.out.print("-"); 
                Thread.sleep(100); 
                System.out.println(")"); 
                Thread.sleep(100); 
            }
            catch(InterruptedException e)
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}


public static void main(String[] args)
{
    new Smiley().start();
    new Smiley().start();
}
}

The purpose is to print one smiley :-) per line. My question is that why synchronizing on instance (this) doesn't achieve this? Why we need to synchronize on static level?

Thanks,

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1  
I know this is just an example, but I wanted to note that you normally dont want to hold locks while sleeping –  John Kane Jun 27 '12 at 23:34
    
@JohnKane I agree with you, but I assume that this is to force a context switch, and encourage the threads to print the smileys interleaved. –  Jonathon Reinhart Jun 27 '12 at 23:47
1  
@Jonathon Reinhart yeah I Was thinking that too, I just wanted to add that as a side note for a more general case –  John Kane Jun 28 '12 at 0:20
    
Whilst we're on notes: It's usually not the done thing to extend Thread directly - prefer passing in a Runnable. Locking on a Thread is a bad idea because Thread may well use that lock (typically OpenJDK-derived implementations do for join, IIRC), and then object is available globally and you need to have a level of unnecessary dependency throughout your program to decide who does what to it. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jun 28 '12 at 1:05

3 Answers 3

Because note that the main() function creates two Smiley classes. And they each run on their own thread. Since they are locking on this, they are both going to acquire the lock immediately, with no contention with the other thread. In this case, their locking scheme of synchronize(this) accomplishes nothing.

When dealing with multithreading issues, you have to think "What am I trying to protect?" In this case, you need to protect System.out, to ensure that you are accessing it in the order you want to. Since System.out is static, you need some sort of outer scope lock which each thread has to acquire before they can write to it.

You can use ReentrantLock to achieve this.

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Please do not use synchronized (this) - this is bad practice in general
As explained above - the lock should be shared between the two threads, and in this case the lock is the instance of each class (i.e - the objects created by new Smiley).
What you should have is a shared lock, maybe by using a static variable, which is shared among all instances of the same class,
or pass a lock as parameter to the CTOR of smiley.
I will give example for the 2nd option, based on the suggestion of @Jonathon Reinhart to use a Reentrant Lock

public class Smiley extends Thread
{
   private  ReentantLock lock;

   public Smiley(ReentrantLock lock) { 
      this.lock = lock;
   }

   @Override
   public void run()
   { 
     while(true)
     { 
        try {
           lock.lock();
           System.out.print(":"); 
           Thread.sleep(100); 
           System.out.print("-"); 
           Thread.sleep(100); 
           System.out.println(")"); 
           Thread.sleep(100); 
        }
        catch(InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
        }
        finally {  
           lock.unlock();
        }
     } 
  }

}


public static void main(String[] args)
{
    ReentrantLock lock = new ReentantLock();
    new Smiley(lock).start();
    new Smiley(lock).start();
}

Some pointers -
a. bare in mind that the unlock code must be in a finally clause - this is a good practice (you can also have try block and finally block, without a catch block).
b. You may consider replacing ReentrantLock with other locks from java.util.concurrent package - based on your needs

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It's actually two questions you are asking, and the answers are:

  • Why synchronizing on instance (this) doesn't achieve this?

Because you are acquiring two different implicit locks, so the instructions inside the synchronized block are allowed to be executed concurrently by the two threads and may be actually interleaved.

  • Why we need to synchronize on static level?

You don't need to synchronize on a static level. You need to synchronize on the same instance of an object shared by the threads.

The simplest way to achieve what you want is to synchronize on System.out in the following way:

@Override
public void run() {
    while (true) {
        synchronized (System.out) {
            try {
                System.out.print(":");
                Thread.sleep(100);
                System.out.print("-");
                Thread.sleep(100);
                System.out.println(")");
                Thread.sleep(100);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}
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