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Im writing a program in java and part of it has to evaluate cleavages in a protein sequence. I have to evaluate if the cleavage happens at certain groups on either end which results in if, else/elseif statements with either annoying logicals in several places, nesting, or just several "if"s and/or "else"s. I've used switch as an alternative to having to evaluate several "if"s and logicals (&&, ||) each time a cleavage happens (this loop will iterate literally MILLIONS of times, possible tens or hundreds of millions).

heres the chunk of code: -.getSeq() gets a string representing the sequence of a protein -startPos and endPos are the indices of the cleavages on either end -sorry if the if statement lines are broken into multiple lines or convoluted, but that's kind of my case and point about the logicals.

/**0: non-tryptic, 1: half-tryptic, 2: fully tryptic**************/
public boolean checkPep(int trypticity){
    boolean evaluator = false;
    int prev = 0;
    if (startPos != 0){
        prev = 1;
    }
    switch(trypticity){
/**do not check cleavage if peptide can be non-tryptic*/
    case 0:
        evaluator = true;
        break;
/***half-tryptic*/
/**check if either the start OR end cleavage is tryptic*/
    case 1:
        switch(protein.getSeq().charAt(startPos-prev)){
        case 'K':
            evaluator = true;
            break;
        case 'R':
            evaluator = true;
            break;
        default :
            switch(protein.getSeq().charAt(endPos)){
            case 'K':
                evaluator = true;
                break;
            case 'R':
                evaluator = true;
                break;
            default:
                evaluator = false;
                break;
            }
            break;
        }
        break;
/**fully tryptic*/
/**if first cleavage is tryptic, check end cleavage*/
/**evaluator = true IFF both cleavages are tryptic*******/
    case 2:
        if(((protein.getSeq().charAt(startPos-1)) == 'K') || ((protein.getSeq().charAt(startPos-1)) == 'R')){
            if(((protein.getSeq().charAt(endPos)) == 'K') || ((protein.getSeq().charAt(endPos)) == 'R')){
                evaluator = true;
            }else{
                evaluator = false;
            }
        }else{
            evaluator = false;
        }
        break;
    }
    return evaluator;
}
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2  
lolz, OP said "cleavage" –  Thomas Eding Jun 28 '12 at 0:21
    
Profiling tools can help you time this, if you are that concerned. Also, in general, compilers are pretty good at optimizing this kind of code -- even your many repeated calls of protein.getSeq() :) –  Ray Toal Jun 28 '12 at 0:21
2  
I'm more worried about readability and debuggability of this code then "efficiency", unless I see profiler data showing that this code is causing an issue. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 28 '12 at 0:31
2  
For integral types (like int, short, and, yes, char), if the range isn't too big, Java can turn the switch statement into a lookup table of places to jump to, potentially making it faster. But til you've profiled it and seen it's faster in your case, readability wins out IMO. Personally, though, i find switch statements more readable as well when it involves checking more than one possibility and an else. –  cHao Jun 28 '12 at 0:43
1  
If you are that concerned about performance that you're drilling down to if vs. switch, then why aren't you caching the results of protein.getSeq() and especially protein.getSeq().charAt(...) instead of calling them multiple times across the cases and ||s? –  sparc_spread Jun 28 '12 at 0:52

1 Answer 1

This kind of thing is what we'd call a micro-optimization.

Using a switch instead of an if chain may be beneficial ... or it may not. It very much depends on the context.

The only way to be sure is to carefully benchmark the code, comparing the versions with and without the potential optimization. It is also a good idea to profile first so that you don't waste time optimizing code that doesn't really matter.

Note that the effects of a given micro-optimization may vary depending on your actual execution hardware, Operating System and JVM version / flavour. (And possibly other things too ... like how much physical memory is available and how big the heap is.) Predicting the benefits from first principles is hard, and it is always possible that a platform change can negate all of your hand tuning work.

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