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Perhaps I am doing something wrong while z-normalizing my array. Can someone take a look at this and suggest what's going on?

In R:

> data <- c(2.02, 2.33, 2.99, 6.85, 9.20, 8.80, 7.50, 6.00, 5.85, 3.85, 4.85, 3.85, 2.22, 1.45, 1.34)
> data.mean <- mean(data)
> data.sd <- sqrt(var(data))
> data.norm <- (data - data.mean) / data.sd
> print(data.norm)
 [1] -0.9796808 -0.8622706 -0.6123005  0.8496459  1.7396910  1.5881940  1.0958286  0.5277147  0.4709033 -0.2865819
[11]  0.0921607 -0.2865819 -0.9039323 -1.1955641 -1.2372258

In Python using numpy:

>>> import string
>>> import numpy as np
>>> from scipy.stats import norm
>>> data = np.array([np.array([2.02, 2.33, 2.99, 6.85, 9.20, 8.80, 7.50, 6.00, 5.85, 3.85, 4.85, 3.85, 2.22, 1.45, 1.34])])
>>> data -= np.split(np.mean(data, axis=1), data.shape[0])
>>> data *= np.split(1.0/data.std(axis=1), data.shape[0])
>>> print data

[[-1.01406602 -0.89253491 -0.63379126  0.87946705  1.80075126  1.64393692
   1.13429034  0.54623659  0.48743122 -0.29664045  0.09539539 -0.29664045
  -0.93565885 -1.23752644 -1.28065039]]

Am I using numpy incorrectly?

share|improve this question
    
Why are you setting data as an np.array inside another np.array? –  Hugh Bothwell Jun 28 '12 at 1:30
    
@HughBothwell: Oh... I did not notice that. This was simplified from a bigger piece of code where data was an array of arrays. –  Legend Jun 28 '12 at 1:31
1  
Just for the record, in R you can normalize using data.norm <- scale(data, center=TRUE, scale=TRUE) –  Marius Jun 28 '12 at 2:36
    
@Marius: Interesting trick! Thank you... –  Legend Jun 28 '12 at 2:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I believe that your NumPy result is correct. I would do the normalization in a simpler way, though:

>>> data = np.array([2.02, 2.33, 2.99, 6.85, 9.20, 8.80, 7.50, 6.00, 5.85, 3.85, 4.85, 3.85, 2.22, 1.45, 1.34])
>>> data -= data.mean()
>>> data /= data.std()
>>> data
array([-1.01406602, -0.89253491, -0.63379126,  0.87946705,  1.80075126,
        1.64393692,  1.13429034,  0.54623659,  0.48743122, -0.29664045,
        0.09539539, -0.29664045, -0.93565885, -1.23752644, -1.28065039])

The difference between your two results lies in the normalization: with r as the R result:

>>> r / data
array([ 0.96609173,  0.96609173,  0.96609173,  0.96609179,  0.96609179, 0.96609181,  0.9660918 ,  0.96609181,
        0.96609179,  0.96609179,        0.9660918 ,  0.96609179,  0.96609175,  0.96609176,  0.96609177])

Thus, your two results are mostly simply proportional to each other. You may therefore want to compare the standard deviations obtained with R and with Python.

PS: Now that I am thinking of it, it may be that the variance in NumPy and in R is not defined in the same way: for N elements, some tools normalize with N-1 instead of N, when calculating the variance. You may want to check this.

PPS: Here is the reason for the discrepancy: the difference in factors comes from two different normalization conventions: the observed factor is simply sqrt(14/15) = 0.9660917… (because the data has 15 elements). Thus, in order to obtain in R the same result as in Python, you need to divide the R result by this factor.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Thank for confirming. Is this approach extensible for the case when data has multiple arrays inside (like in my question but multiple array elements)? Also, any idea why the result from R is different? –  Legend Jun 28 '12 at 1:33
1  
@Legend I can confirm that R uses n-1 as a denominator, and was just thinking that might be the difference. As a stats guy, I'm actually a little shocked that numpy would use n by default, but I'm sure someone's saying just the opposite about R right now. –  joran Jun 28 '12 at 1:42
    
@Legend: The axis=1 parameter that you used in the answer is the way to go, if you have arrays inside arrays. –  EOL Jun 28 '12 at 1:45
    
Awesome! Thank you for the detailed explanation. –  Legend Jun 28 '12 at 1:52
2  
@joran: I may be biased, but I prefer the N convention (ba-dum-bum). –  Joshua Ulrich Jun 28 '12 at 2:33

The reason you're getting different results has to do with how the standard deviation/variance is calculated. R calculates using denominator N-1, while numpy calculates using denominator N. You can get a numpy result equal to the R result by using data.std(ddof=1), which tells numpy to use N-1 as the denominator when calculating the variance.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for ddof=1, which is simpler than putting the correcting factor by hand. –  EOL Jun 28 '12 at 1:48
    
+1 Thank you for the approach! –  Legend Jun 28 '12 at 1:52

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