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I have some thread to write resource and some to read it.But pthread_rwlock cause a lot of context switch. So I imagine a way to avoid it. But I'm not sure it is safe or not.

This is the code:

sig_atomic_t slot = 0;

struct resource {
    sig_atomic_t in_use;  /*Counter,if in_use, not zero*/
    .....
} xxx[2];

int read_thread()
{
    i = slot; /*avoid slot changes in process */
    xxx[i].in_use++;
    read(xxx[i]);
    xxx[i].in_use--;
}

int write_thread()
{
    mutex_lock;  /*mutex between write threads */

    if (slot == 0) {
    while(xxx[1].in_use != 0);  /*wait last read thread in slot 1*/
    clear(xxx[1]);
    write(xxx[1]);
    slot = 1;
    } else if (slot == 1) {
    while(xxx[0].in_use != 0);
    clear(xxx[0]);
    write(xxx[0]);
    slot = 0;
    }

    mutex_unlock;
}

Will that works? The cost is 2 times storage and 3 atomic variable. Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
    
What prevents reading while writing? The read never waits. –  stark Jun 28 '12 at 2:21
    
Thanks for accepting my answer, +1 on your question from me. –  jxh Jul 2 '12 at 4:00
    
What about the single-threaded memory-barrier-only ringbuffer? –  user82238 Jul 3 '12 at 8:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your strategy is to have writers write to a different slot than what the readers are reading from. And you are switching the reading slot number after a write is completed. However, you will have a race.

slot    reader             writer1            writer2
----    ------             -------            -------
0                          mutex_lock
        i = 0
                           ... slot=1
1                          mutex_unlock       mutex_lock
                                              ... clear(xxx[0])
        xxx[0].in_use++
        read(xxx[0])                          write(xxx[0])

In general, though, this strategy could lead to starvation of writers (that is a writer may spin forever).

However, if you are willing to tolerate that, it would be safer to let xxx[] be an array of 2 pointers to resource. Let the reader always read from xxx[0], and let the writers contend for updates on xxx[1]. When a writer is finished updating xxx[1], it uses CAS on xxx[0] and xxx[1].

struct resource {
    sig_atomic_t in_use;  /*Counter,if in_use, not zero*/
    sig_atomic_t writer;
    .....
} *xxx[2];

void read_thread()
{
    resource *p = xxx[0];
    p->in_use++;
    while (p->writer) {
        p->in_use--;
        p = xxx[0];
        p->in_use++;
    }
    read(*p);
    p->in_use--;
}

void write_thread()
{
    resource *p;
    mutex_lock;  /*mutex between write threads */
    xxx[1]->writer = 1;

    while(xxx[1]->in_use != 0);  /*wait last read thread in slot 1*/
    clear(xxx[1]);
    write(xxx[1]);
    xxx[1] = CAS(&xxx[0], p = xxx[0], xxx[1]);
    assert(p == xxx[1]);

    xxx[0]->writer = 0;
    mutex_unlock;
}

If you want to avoid writer starvation, but you want the performance of spinlocks, you are looking at implementing your own reader/writer locks using spinlocks instead of mutex locks. A google search for "read write spinlock implementation" pointed to this page which I found to be an interesting read.

share|improve this answer
    
That's wonderful –  HardySimpson Jul 2 '12 at 1:38
    
Your suggested solution has a similar race to the one you identified in the OPs code - a reader can load the pointer value xxx[0], then have a writer swap xxx[1] and xxx[0], then another writer come in and start modifying the new xxx[1] (the old xxx[0]) before the reader dereferences the pointer and does the increment. –  caf Jul 2 '12 at 7:47
    
@caf: Thanks for that! I've modified the algorithm. Regards –  jxh Jul 2 '12 at 8:26

Your algorithm is not lock-free; the writers use a spin lock.

Is it really necessary to do double-buffering and spin locks? Could you instead use (slot ^ 1) as the writing slot and slot as the reading slot? After writing, the writer would atomically change the value of slot, thus "publishing" its write. You may read the same slot many times consecutively this way, but if that's not the semantics you want then you should be using a queue.

By the way, a sig_atomic_t does not provide the type of atomicity you need for multiple threads. At a minimum, you should declare slot as volatile sig_atomic_t, and use memory barriers when reading and writing.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for the sig_atomic_t, yes it is not thead-atomic. –  HardySimpson Jul 2 '12 at 1:31

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