Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need to implement Two phase commit protocol using TransactionManager and ResourceManager. I've been googling this for hours and can't find anything useful. I know how protocol works, but I don't know where to begin this implementation. Could anyone point me in right direction?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would start by looking at what Spring has to offer with transaction management. They have great support for switching out transaction managers. You did not specify how you're running your application (i.e. what app server), but each app server has an implementation of a JTA transaction manager. Spring offers pluggable transaction manager implementations for several app servers . For example, they have one for IBM WebSphere (org.springframework.transaction.jta.WebSphereUowTransactionManager). This will allow your application to switch the transaction managers much easier.

Below is a Spring reference. Note, 2 phase commit stuff is often found in relation to global transaction management (versus local transaction management).

http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.0.x/reference/transaction.html

Provide your app server and you might get some better answers, too.

share|improve this answer
    
I need to implement two phase commit protocol using JINI, it's not any app server directly. – aumanets Jun 28 '12 at 23:14
    
Why reinvent the wheel? Apache river already has a JINI transaction manager implementation. – Uncredited Jun 29 '12 at 12:09

Have a look at Atomikos implementation. http://www.atomikos.com/Documentation/TwoPhaseCommitWithTomcatSpringJMSAndJDBC

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.