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This has defeated me. I want to have a static class variable which is a pointer to a (non-static) member function. I've tried all sorts of ways, but with no luck (including using typedefs, which just seemed to give me a different set of errors). In the code below I have the static class function pointer funcptr, and I can call it successfully from outside the class, but not from within the member function CallFuncptr - which is what I want to do. Any suggestions?

#include <stdio.h>

class A
{
public:
  static int (A::*funcptr)();
  int Four() { return 4;};
  int CallFuncptr() { return (this->*funcptr)(); } 
      // doesn't link -  undefined reference to `A::funcptr'
};
int (A::*funcptr)() = &A::Four;

int main()
{
  A fred;
  printf("four? %d\n", (fred.*funcptr)());  // This works
  printf("four? %d\n", fred.CallFuncptr()); // But this is the way I want to call it
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this instead:

#include <iostream>

class A {
public:
    typedef int (A::*AMemFn)();
    static AMemFn funcptr;
    int Four() { return 4; }
    int CallFuncptr() { return (this->*funcptr)(); }
};

A::AMemFn A::funcptr = &A::Four;

int main()
{
    A fred;
    std::cout << "four? " << fred.CallFuncptr() << std::endl;
}
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Works a treat - many thanks! –  bandjalong Jun 28 '12 at 11:15

jweyrich has a nice looking work around (and I suggest you use it), but I thought I'd elaborate on what the real problem in the code is:

Your problem is this line:

int (A::*funcptr)() = &A::Four;

This is defining a global variable called funcptr that is of the right type, rather than A::funcptr.

What you need is this mess:

int (A::*(A::funcptr))() = &A::Four;

This ugly mess is why I suggest you go down the typedef path to get a nice looking version like jweyrich's solution.

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Ah, thanks! ..I was thinking along those lines - just couldn't guess how to attach that second A::. It is indeed a little non obvious.. –  bandjalong Jun 28 '12 at 11:19

A static variable is not a member of a particular object -- it can only be accessed through the classes namespace. CallFuncptr should be rewritten: int CallFuncptr() { return (*funcptr)(); which I think should work, since this function can access functions in A's namespace without specifying it.

Also, function pointers are more of a C construct than C++. You can access the static variable outside the class with the code: A::CallFuncptr since CallFunctptr just resides in A's namespace

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