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I am trying to compare two decimal values but I am getting errors. I used

if [ "$(echo $result1 '>' $result2 | bc -l)" -eq 1 ];then

as suggested by the other Stack Overflow thread.

I am getting errors.

What is the correct way to go about this?

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What are the errors? misspelled one variable name. –  ormaaj Jun 28 '12 at 4:01
    
actually the errors are due to some other issues. This works fine. –  redmave Jun 28 '12 at 4:21
    
What do you mean by 'decimal values'? Do you mean integers in base 10, or do you mean strings that represent non-integer real values? –  William Pursell Jun 28 '12 at 14:16
    
@WilliamPursell: I'm assuming that since the OP is using bc especially with -l that it's floats that are being compared. The -l isn't needed for comparisons though. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 28 '12 at 14:31

8 Answers 8

You can do it using Bash's numeric context:

if (( $(echo "$result1 > $result2" | bc -l) )); then

bc will output 0 or 1 and the (( )) will interpret them as false or true respectively.

The same thing using AWK:

if (( $(echo "$result1 $result2" | awk '{print ($1 > $2)}') )); then
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3  
+1 for the awk solution, but: if echo $result1 $result2 | awk '{exit !( $1 > $2)}'; then ... –  William Pursell Jun 28 '12 at 14:19

I like progz’s answer, but I prefer no echo

if awk "BEGIN {exit !($result1 > $result2)}"
then
  echo stuff
fi
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You shouldn't quote the $() part..

This works:

#!/bin/bash

export result1="1.0" 
export result2="2.0"

if [ $(echo "$result1 < $result2" | bc -l ) ]; then
    echo "yes"
else
    echo "no" 
fi
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4  
The quotes are correct. $() should almost always be quoted. –  ormaaj Jun 28 '12 at 4:04
    
I've never heard that $() should be quoted - can you cite any source that stipulates this? –  synthesizerpatel Jun 28 '12 at 5:40
    
It's the same idea as with other expansions where word-splitting and pathname expansion are undesirable. That's especially true of $(). All the problems with splitting fields by IFS and treating stream output as globs apply: Reasons for quoting. Many of the usual antipatterns like reading lines and parsing a compound datastructure from command output are instances of this general problem. If [[ or (( were used, then quotes would be unnecessary. –  ormaaj Jun 28 '12 at 6:20

Probably your variables are empty or not integers.

Try with the numbers:

$ [ "$(echo 10 '<' 20 | bc -l)" = 1 ] && echo true || echo false
true
$ [ "$(echo 10 '>' 20 | bc -l)" = 1 ] && echo true || echo false
false
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A more general solution is to use Perl to evaluate the bool expression, e.g. on Solaris in our case, where bc doesn't work, nor awk.

perl -e "exit (-6.0E6 < 1 ? 0 : 1)"

so you can do the following

perl -e "exit ($result1 < $result2 ? 0 : 1)" && {...} || {...}

then you can play with it, convert it to if [ ]; then; else form, or even define functions.

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You can also echo an if...else statement to bc.

- echo $result1 '>' $result2
+ echo "if (${result1} > ${result2}) 1 else 0"

(
#export IFS=2  # example why quoting is important
result1="2.3" 
result2="1.7" 
if [ "$(echo $result1 '>' $result2 | bc -l)" -eq 1 ]; then echo yes; else echo no;fi
if [ "$(echo "if (${result1} > ${result2}) 1 else 0" | bc -l)" -eq 1 ];then echo yes; else echo no; fi
if echo $result1 $result2 | awk '{exit !( $1 > $2)}'; then echo yes; else echo no; fi
)
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Can't bash force type conversion? For example:

($result1 + 0) < ($result2 + 0)
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Why use bc ?

for i in $(seq -3 0.5 4) ; do echo $i ; if [[ (( "$i" < 2 )) ]] ; then echo "... is < 2";fi; done

The only problem : the comparison "<" doesn't work with negative numbers : they are taken as their absolute value.

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< inside [[...]] is for string comparison (so 20 is less than 3, and 0.2 is less than 1e-50). The ('s are redundant, you can add as many as you want, they're only for grouping. –  Stephane Chazelas Jun 14 at 15:30

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