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I'm putting together a .Net 4 library that is designed to be distributed as a standalone assembly. Part of the library does some ad-hoc web service calls in which I plan on returning a projected version of to the consumer of the library. There will be an extensive amount of mapping that needs to happen between the webservice response representation and what the consumer of the library will actually get. I'm hoping to leverage AutoMapper for this task; as more often than not, conventions will be able to take care of a lot of the boring right-to-left mapping code for me.

So for example, my library might expose code that looks somewhat like:

public Widget GetWidget(Guid id)
{
    // Get server representation
    ServerWidget serverWidget = this.Request<ServerWidget>(id);

    // Map to client representation
    Widget clientWidget = Mapper.Map<ServerWidget, Widget>(serverWidget);

    return clientWidget;
}

Elsewhere in code I'll have obviously needed to call (plus any custom configuration for the mapping):

Mapper.CreateMap<ServerWidget, Widget>();

Per design guidelines of AutoMapper, this should be only done once per AppDomain (as it is an expensive operation). Since this library could be used in any number of possible environments (ASP.NET, WinForms app, WPF app, unit test runner, etc), how does one go about properly setting the maps up in a situation like this?

Obviously, my code could expose some sort of method for the client to call to "initialize things" (mapper in this case) and assume they did indeed make that call, and at the right time in the application startup process, but that seems like a really lame requirement to impose on a consumer of the library.

Anyone have any suggestions for me and/or could point me to an open-source project on GitHub, Codeplex, etc that is already doing something like this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about having a static IsMappingInitialised method in your library which you check before doing a mapping like this, which is thread safe:

private static readonly object MappingLock = new object();
private static bool _ready = false;

public static bool IsMappingInitialised()
{
    if (!_ready)
    {
        lock (MappingLock)
        {
            if (!_ready)
            {
                Mapper.CreateMap<ServerWidget, Widget>();
                _ready = true;
            }
        }
    }

    return _ready;
}

that way you do not need to rely on your consumers to carry out the initialisation.

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Thanks, this worked just fine for my needs. –  ckittel Jul 3 '12 at 0:54

You can also make use of the static constructor feature of .Net. Add a static constructor in your class and add the creation of the map. You will not need any locking since the CLR ensures that the static constructor can be executed only once per AppDomain. This is enough for your case since you are using the static mapper (AutoMapper.Mapper) which is also one per AppDomain.

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