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I'm trying to write a procedure for a baseball program that will use multiple generators to get strikes and balls. My generators look like this:

k = (strike(x) for x in range(3) if x%1 ==0)  
w = (ball(n) for n in range(4) if x%1 == 0)

The procedure that I have so far looks like this:

def count(pitch):
    if pitch == 'strike':
        return next(k),w
    elif pitch =='ball':
        return next(w),k

I would like my code to return the next results for strike and also return the current for balls, And vice versa. Please help I'm pretty stumped.

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5  
Can you give more details about what this is supposed to do? x%1==0 is always True –  gnibbler Jun 28 '12 at 6:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

An easier way to do this :

k = [x for x in range(3)]
w = [n for n in range(4)]
i=0
j=0

def countt(pitch):
    global i
    global j
    if pitch == 'strike':

        if i==len(k)-1:
            i=0
        else:i=i+1
        return k[i],w[j]

    elif pitch =='ball':
        if j==len(w)-1:
            j=0
        else:j=j+1    
        return w[j],k[i]    

output:

>>> countt('strike')
(1, 0)
>>> countt('strike')
(2, 0)
>>> countt('ball')
(1, 2)
>>> countt('ball')
(2, 2)
>>> countt('ball')
(3, 2)
>>> countt('strike')
(0, 3)
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Very nice. This is a great model for what I'm looking to do, thank you. –  Moe Jan Jun 29 '12 at 1:00
    
One last question..How would i get BOTH k and w to reset once k reaches 3 or w reaches 4? –  Moe Jan Jun 29 '12 at 1:02
    
Nevermind! got it –  Moe Jan Jun 29 '12 at 4:08

There is no way to get the "current" value of a generator without advancing the generator. If you want to keep track of a "current" value, you need to store it yourself. This means you'll have to refactor your code, because the count function will "forget" any of its values on the next call. Here's one way to do it with a class:

class Count(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.k = (x for x in range(3))
        self.w = (x for x in range(4))
        self.strikes = next(self.k)
        self.balls = next(self.w)

    def count(self, pitch):
        if pitch == "strike":
            self.strikes = next(self.k)
        elif pitch == "ball":
            self.balls = next(self.w)
        return self.strikes, self.balls

I removed references to strike and ball functions since you don't provide info on those, but you could add them in. Then:

>>> c = Count()
>>> c.count("strike")
(1, 0)
>>> c.count("strike")
(2, 0)
>>> c.count("ball")
(2, 1)

As @gnibbler noted in a comment, you should also think about what you're trying to do with that x%1 business.

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