Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have 2 files that I want combined as below. FILE1:

AAA 
1234 
BBB
2341

FILE2:

AAA
9876
67 89 01
BBB
4567
23 45 23

Final file required

AAA 1234 9876 67 89 01
BBB 2341 4567 23 45 23

How do I achieve this in awk or sed or both?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Pure awk:

/^[A-Z]/ {
    token=$1
}
/^[0-9]/{
    for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) {
        C[token]=C[token] " " $i
    }
}
END {
    for (i in C) {
        print i, C[i]
    }
}

Output:

$ awk -f f.awk f1 f2
AAA  1234 9876 67 89 01
BBB  2341 4567 23 45 23

Can be shortened to a 3-liner:

/^[A-Z]/ { token=$1 }
/^[0-9]/ { C[token]=C[token] " " $0 }
END { for (i in C) { print i, C[i] } }
share|improve this answer
    
it's certainly better ) –  nick Jun 28 '12 at 8:48
    
+1 - Can be shortened to a one-liner. Array elements accessed using in are not in a guaranteed order. You can save indices in a numerically indexed array and access them using a double subscript to preserve the order. Or you can print as you go by printing each time you see a new token. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 28 '12 at 12:05

You can try this ( perhaps it's to large solution, but it work ):

a.awk:

function print_stuff( start_string, end_string, file2 )
{
    printf "%s ", start_string

    getline 

    while ( $0 != end_string )
    {
        for ( i = 1; i < NF + 1; i++ )
        {
            printf "%s ", $i    
        }

        if ( getline <= 0 )
        {
            break    
        }
    }

    while ( $0 != start_string )
    {
        if ( ( getline < file2 ) <= 0 )
        {
            break    
        }
    }

    getline < file2

    while ( $0 != end_string )
    {
        for ( i = 1; i < NF + 1; i++ )
        {
            printf "%s ", $i    
        }

        if ( ( getline < file2 ) <= 0 )
        {
            break    
        }
    }

    printf "\n"

    close( file2 )
}


BEGIN { file2 = "file2"; aaa = "AAA"; bbb = "BBB" }

aaa { print_stuff( aaa, bbb, file2 ) }
bbb { print_stuff( bbb, "",  file2 ) }

run: awk -f a.awk file1

output:

AAA 1234 9876 67 89 01 
BBB 2341 4567 23 45 23
share|improve this answer
    
yup, lengthy :-) –  Fredrik Pihl Jun 28 '12 at 8:34

transform.awk

{key=($1 ~/[A-Z]+/)}

key==1 {
if(NR>1) {printf "\n"}
printf "%s",$1}

key==0 {printf " %s",$0}

END {printf "\n"}

This will transform the file without assuming a fixed number of entries, but rather that the key confirm to a certain pattern as given by the regular expression in the first row. In this case a stretch of capital letters.

join <(awk -F transform.awk file1) <(awk -F transform.awk file2)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.