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To round a number I use the following code:

public static roundBd(BigDecimal bd){
  BigDecimal result1 = bd.setScale(0, RoundingMode.HALF_UP);
  return result1;
}
  • Input 1.50 --> Output 2
  • Input 1.499 --> Output 1

The first result is ok for me, but the second is not what I expected. Even for 1.499 I'd like to have in output 2. (In details: first I'd like to round 1.499 to 1.50 then to 1.5 and finally to 2)

But....

BigDecimal bd = new BigDecimal("1.499");  // I'd like to round it to 2
BigDecimal result1 = bd.setScale(2, RoundingMode.HALF_UP); // result1 == 1.50
BigDecimal result2 = bd.setScale(1, RoundingMode.HALF_UP); // result2 == 1.5
BigDecimal result3 = bd.setScale(0, RoundingMode.HALF_UP); // result3 == 1
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From that rounding style 1.4444444445 would round up to 2. That's not what we want. –  Hafthor May 23 '14 at 20:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's not the way rounding works. HALP_UP means that if a number is exactly in the middle between the 2 closest available values (depending on the scale), it will be rounded up. Anything else is rounded to the closest value.

Extract from the javadoc:

Rounding mode to round towards "nearest neighbor" unless both neighbors are equidistant

To get to the behaviour you require, you could round successively although I'm not sure why you want such a behaviour:

BigDecimal bd = new BigDecimal("1.499");  // I'd like to round it to 2
BigDecimal result1 = bd.setScale(2, RoundingMode.HALF_UP); // result1 == 1.50
BigDecimal result2 = result1.setScale(0, RoundingMode.HALF_UP); // result2 == 2
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Assylias, you're right. But I need to round an Euro currency value. The rule says that 1.499 should be rounded to 1.50. Then if I want to round it to integer I should get 2. –  Andrea Borgogelli Avveduti Jun 28 '12 at 9:12
    
@AndreaBorgogelliAvveduti Ok - then the example I give should do what you need. Or more precisely, you should round all your currency amounts to 2 decimal places and that's your "official" value. Then you use that value and do what you want / need, including rounding it to 0 decimal places if you wish. –  assylias Jun 28 '12 at 9:13
    
Yes, very good advice –  Andrea Borgogelli Avveduti Jun 28 '12 at 9:13
1  
My JUnit tests say that's the right solution for Euro rounding. Thank you. –  Andrea Borgogelli Avveduti Jun 28 '12 at 17:28

This result is exactly what you should get; rounding each intermediate sacrifices precision, so it rounds directly to the correct number of digits.

If you really want the other behavior, you'll have to do something like

while(number.scale() > 0) {
  number.setScale(number.scale() - 1, RoundingMode.HALF_UP);
}
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Louise, on second thoughts you're right, the previous code do what should do. But I need to round an Euro currency value. The rule says that 1.499 should be rounded to 1.50. Then if I want to round it to integer I should get 2. –  Andrea Borgogelli Avveduti Jun 28 '12 at 9:10
    
Louise, thank you for the advice –  Andrea Borgogelli Avveduti Jun 28 '12 at 17:28

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