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Are there no "high-level" HTTP libraries for native C/C++ in Win32 or am I just looking in the wrong places?

By "high-level" I mean an API that lets me do HTTP web requests/responses in C++ with "about the same" abstraction level as the .NET framework (but note that using C++/CLI is not an option for me).

How to do something like this (with about the same amount of code) in C/C++ in Win32 without using .NET? As a reference, I include a code sample to show how I'd do it in C#.

byte[] fileBytes = null;
bool successfulDownload = false;
using (WebClient client = new WebClient())
{
    WebProxy proxy = WebProxy.GetDefaultProxy();
    client.Proxy = proxy;
tryAgain:
    try
    {
        fileBytes = client.DownloadData(fileUrl);
        successfulDownload = true;
    }
    catch (WebException wEx)
    {
        if (wEx.Response != null && wEx.Response is HttpWebResponse)
        {
            string username = null, password = null;
            bool userCanceled = false;
            HttpStatusCode statusCode = ((HttpWebResponse)wEx.Response).StatusCode;
            switch (statusCode)
            {
                case HttpStatusCode.ProxyAuthenticationRequired:
                    // This is just a convenience function defined elsewhere
                    GetAuthenticationCredentials(fileUrl, true,
                        out username, out password, out userCanceled);
                    if (!userCanceled)
                    {
                        client.Proxy.Credentials = new NetworkCredential(username, password);
                        goto tryAgain;
                    }
                    break;
                case HttpStatusCode.Unauthorized:
                    // This is just a convenience function defined elsewhere
                    GetAuthenticationCredentials(fileUrl, false,
                        out username, out password, out userCanceled);
                    if (!userCanceled)
                    {
                        client.Credentials = new NetworkCredential(username, password);
                        goto tryAgain;
                    }
                    break;
            }
        }
    }
}
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duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/822581/… –  Piotr Dobrogost Jul 14 '09 at 8:43

8 Answers 8

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Win32 provides the Internet* functions.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa385473(VS.85).aspx

You'll need to do an (IIRC, I haven't touched these APIs in over 10 years) InternetOpenURL and InternetReadFile.

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This is as close as it gets to what I intend to do, but still not quite there. The issue is that you need to write quite a bit of code for "exotic" proxy scenarios (auto-proxy configuration scrips, and Web Proxy Autodiscovery Protocol). –  Guido Domenici Jul 14 '09 at 9:32
    
Maybe im being daft but for auto-proxy configuration scripts isn't it just a one flag change to InternetOpen? Can't give any help on WPAD though ... –  Goz Jul 14 '09 at 11:31
    
While searching for something completely unrelated i came across this page on MSDN? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa383910.aspx It does require a load of extra code from you but it doesn't look particularly complex :) –  Goz Jul 14 '09 at 14:01
    
Thanks Goz, I had overlooked the INTERNET_OPEN_TYPE_PRECONFIG flag in InternetOpen(). This is exactly what I was looking for. –  Guido Domenici Jul 15 '09 at 12:53

I think libcurl matches those requirements. And then some.

This example shows how to get a HTTP page, storing it in memory only. It's a bit more code than your example, but it's in C.

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This is a good answer - libcurl is indeed a great library and that what I'm using so far. However, it falls short in the proxy area. For example, it doesn't support (as the .NET classes do) automatic proxy configuration scripts. –  Guido Domenici Jul 14 '09 at 9:30

POCO also has cross platform networking components.

The examples give a FTP program as something like this (This is without the error checking fluff)

Poco::Net::FTPStreamFactory::registerFactory();
std::ofstream localFile(inputFile, std::ios_base::out | std::ios_base::binary);
Poco::URI uri(inputURL);
std::auto_ptr<std::istream> ptrFtpStream(Poco::Net::URIStreamOpener::defaultOpener().open(uri));
Poco::StreamCopier::copyStream(*ptrFtpStream.get(), localFile);
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Apart from libcurl/curlpp (which is flexible and powerful but I find very...clunky) there are two C++ libraries I'm keeping my eye on. Both are quite new and based on Boost::ASIO. However neither support proxies (as best I can tell).

cpp-netlib (blog) is perhaps more mature (I know it's had some real-world testing) but is currently lacking timeouts (I'm working on it!). Example:

network::http::request  request("http://google.com");
network::http::client   client;
network::http::response response;

response = client.get(request);
if (response.status() == 200)
{
    std::cout << body(response));
}

Urdl (documentation) is written by the ASIO creator and has timeouts (but was only announced last month). It uses a different model, opting to work with streams:

urdl::istream is("http://google.com");
std::string line;
while (std::getline(is, line))
{
    std::cout << line << std::endl;
}

I agree that C++ doesn't have great support for HTTP but both of these libraries show a lot of promise.

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You are not looking in the wrong places. That's just the sad reality. That's why there's c++ wrapper for libcurl called curlpp.

Below is an example of how to retrive a web page and print it to stdout stream.

#include <curlpp/curlpp.hpp>
#include <curlpp/Easy.hpp>
#include <curlpp/Options.hpp>


using namespace curlpp::options;

int main(int, char **)
{
  try
  {
    // That's all that is needed to do cleanup of used resources (RAII style).
    curlpp::Cleanup myCleanup;

    // Our request to be sent.
    curlpp::Easy myRequest;

    // Set the URL.
    myRequest.setOpt<Url>("http://example.com");

    // Send request and get a result.
    // By default the result goes to standard output.
    myRequest.perform();
  }

  catch(curlpp::RuntimeError & e)
  {
    std::cout << e.what() << std::endl;
  }

  catch(curlpp::LogicError & e)
  {
    std::cout << e.what() << std::endl;
  }

  return 0;
}
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Part of the Qt library, QtNetwork, is also a possibilty.

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Another possibility is Ultimate TCP/IP. It's free and very easy to use.

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