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def main():
    for i in xrange(10**8):
        pass
main()

This piece of code in Python runs in

real    0m1.841s
user    0m1.828s
sys     0m0.012s

However, if the for loop isn't placed within a function,

for i in xrange(10**8):
    pass

then it runs for a much longer time:

real    0m4.543s
user    0m4.524s
sys     0m0.012s

Why is this?

Note: The timing is done with the time function in BASH in Linux.

share|improve this question
7  
How did you actually do the timing? –  Andrew Jaffe Jun 28 '12 at 9:21
25  
Just an intuition, not sure if it's true: I would guess it's because of scopes. In the function case, a new scope is created (i.e. kind of a hash with variable names bound to their value). Without a function, variables are in the global scope, when you can find lot of stuff, hence slowing down the loop. –  Scharron Jun 28 '12 at 9:22
2  
@Scharron That doesn't seem to be it. Defined 200k dummy variables into the scope without that visibly affecting the running time. –  Deestan Jun 28 '12 at 9:27
1  
Alex Martelli wrote a good answer concerning this stackoverflow.com/a/1813167/174728 –  gnibbler Jun 28 '12 at 9:56
20  
@Scharron you're half correct. It is about scopes, but the reason it's faster in locals is that local scopes are actually implemented as arrays instead of dictionaries (since their size is known at compile-time). –  katrielalex Jun 28 '12 at 10:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 238 down vote accepted

You might ask why it is faster to store local variables than globals. This is a CPython implementation detail.

Remember that CPython is compiled to bytecode, which the interpreter runs. When a function is compiled, the local variables are stored in a fixed-size array (not a dict) and variable names are assigned to indexes. This is possible because you can't dynamically add local variables to a function. Then retrieving a local variable is literally a pointer lookup into the list and a refcount increase on the PyObject which is trivial.

Contrast this to a global lookup (LOAD_GLOBAL), which is a true dict search involving a hash and so on. Incidentally, this is why you need to specify global i if you want it to be global: if you ever assign to a variable inside a scope, the compiler will issue STORE_FASTs for its access unless you tell it not to.

By the way, global lookups are still pretty optimised. Attribute lookups foo.bar are the really slow ones!

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2  
This also applies to PyPy, up to the current version (1.8 at the time of this writing.) The test code from the OP runs about four times slower in global scope compared to inside a function. –  GDorn Jun 28 '12 at 17:17
2  
@Walkerneo They aren't, unless you said it backwards. According to what katrielalex and ecatmur are saying, global variable lookups are slower than local variable lookups due to the method of storage. –  Jeremy Pridemore Jun 28 '12 at 18:21
1  
@Walkerneo foo.bar is not a local access. It is an attribute of an object. (Forgive the lack of formatting)def foo_func: x = 5, x is local to a function. Accessing x is local. foo = SomeClass(), foo.bar is attribute access. val = 5 global is global. As for speed local > global > attribute according to what I've read here. So accessing x in foo_func is fastest, followed by val, followed by foo.bar. foo.attr isn't a local lookup because in the context of this convo, we're talking about local lookups being a lookup of a variable that belongs to a function. –  Jeremy Pridemore Jun 29 '12 at 1:57
1  
Correct. A local variable lookup is a fixed-time pointer. A global lookup is a dict search, but with optimisations (I think the dict code is inlined, for instance). An attribute lookup is just a plain Python dict search. –  katrielalex Jun 29 '12 at 15:15
1  
@Walkerneo Ah, I think I see where the confusion might lie. An attribute lookup like foo.bar is not the same as looking up a variable called "foo.bar"; instead, it first looks up the (local) variable called foo but then searches for "bar" in foo.__dict__. It's this second bit that takes time. –  katrielalex Jun 29 '12 at 19:31

Inside a function, the bytecode is

  2           0 SETUP_LOOP              20 (to 23)
              3 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (xrange)
              6 LOAD_CONST               3 (100000000)
              9 CALL_FUNCTION            1
             12 GET_ITER            
        >>   13 FOR_ITER                 6 (to 22)
             16 STORE_FAST               0 (i)

  3          19 JUMP_ABSOLUTE           13
        >>   22 POP_BLOCK           
        >>   23 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             26 RETURN_VALUE        

At top level, the bytecode is

  1           0 SETUP_LOOP              20 (to 23)
              3 LOAD_NAME                0 (xrange)
              6 LOAD_CONST               3 (100000000)
              9 CALL_FUNCTION            1
             12 GET_ITER            
        >>   13 FOR_ITER                 6 (to 22)
             16 STORE_NAME               1 (i)

  2          19 JUMP_ABSOLUTE           13
        >>   22 POP_BLOCK           
        >>   23 LOAD_CONST               2 (None)
             26 RETURN_VALUE        

The difference is that STORE_FAST is faster (!) than STORE_NAME. This is because in a function, i is a local but at toplevel it is a global.

To examine bytecode, use the dis module. I was able to disassemble the function directly, but to disassemble the toplevel code I had to use the compile builtin.

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132  
Confirmed by experiment. Inserting global i into the main function makes the running times equivalent. –  Deestan Jun 28 '12 at 9:33
40  
This answers the question without answering the question :) In the case of local function variables, CPython actually stores these in a tuple (which is mutable from the C code) until a dictionary is requested (e.g. via locals(), or inspect.getframe() etc.). Looking up an array element by a constant integer is much faster than searching a dict. –  dmw Jun 28 '12 at 21:53
2  
It is the same with C/C++ also, using global variables causes significant slowdown –  codejammer Jun 29 '12 at 0:49
3  
This is the first I've seen of bytecode.. How does one look at it, and is important to know? –  Zack Jun 30 '12 at 22:30
3  
@gkimsey I agree. Just wanted to share two things i) This behaviour is noted in other programming languages ii) The causal agent is more the architectural side and not the language itself in true sense –  codejammer Jul 19 '12 at 13:28

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