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I have written two functions that convert a string of whitespace-separated integers into an int array. The first function uses Substring and then applies System.Int32.Parse to convert the substring into an int value:

let intsOfString (s: string) =
  let ints = ResizeArray()
  let rec inside i j =
    if j = s.Length then
      ints.Add(s.Substring(i, j-i) |> System.Int32.Parse)
    else
      let c = s.[j]
      if '0' <= c && c <= '9' then
        inside i (j+1)
      else
        ints.Add(s.Substring(i, j-i) |> System.Int32.Parse)
        outside (j+1)
  and outside i =
    if i < s.Length then
      let c = s.[i]
      if '0' <= c && c <= '9' then
        inside i (i+1)
      else
        outside (i+1)
  outside 0
  ints.ToArray()

The second function traverses the characters of the string in-place accumulating the integer without creating a temporary substring:

let intsOfString (s: string) =
  let ints = ResizeArray()
  let rec inside n i =
    if i = s.Length then
      ints.Add n
    else
      let c = s.[i]
      if '0' <= c && c <= '9' then
        inside (10*n + int c - 48) (i+1)
      else
        ints.Add n
        outside(i+1)
  and outside i =
    if i < s.Length then
      let c = s.[i]
      if '0' <= c && c <= '9' then
        inside (int c - 48) (i+1)
      else
        outside (i+1)
  outside 0
  ints.ToArray()

Benchmarking on space-separated integers 1 to 1,000,000, the first version takes 1.5s whereas the second version takes 0.3s.

Parsing such values can be performance critical so leaving 5x performance on the table by using temporary substrings can be undesirable. Parsing integers is easy but parsing other values such as floating point numbers, decimals and dates is considerably harder.

So, are there built-in functions to parse directly from a substring within a string (i.e. using the given start and length of a string) in order to avoid generating a temporary string? If not, are there any libraries that provide efficient functions to do this?

share|improve this question
4  
Have you tried using regular expressions instead of using Substring? A compiled regular expression can be much faster than string operations –  Panagiotis Kanavos Jun 28 '12 at 9:21
3  
@PanagiotisKanavos Can you explain how a regular expression can be used to parse a string into an array of ints? –  Jon Harrop Jun 28 '12 at 9:26
3  
Such data always comes from a file (or other I/O). Write a benchmark to include the I/O and you will see you're optimizing something that consumes less than 1% of the time. –  Henk Holterman Jun 28 '12 at 9:33
3  
@HenkHolterman It might be less than 1% overall but it could still be a bottleneck. In my case I have thousands of messages coming in per second over the network, each containing lots of decimals, that have to be processed in a strict order limiting the amount I can parse and process in parallel. I made a similar change to my parsing logic recently and doubled my overall throughput... –  MrKWatkins Jun 28 '12 at 9:47
2  
I have a really bad advice. Have you considered FParsec? –  pad Jun 28 '12 at 12:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Paste all this code into C# and call Test(). This is as close as you can get to operating directly on the string array to parse numbers using C#. It is built for speed, not elagence. I created the ParseInt and ParseFloat for an OpenGL graphics engine to import vectors from text-based 3d models. Parsing floats is a significant bottleneck in that process. This was as fast as I could make it.

using System.Diagnostics;

    private void Test() {
        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        int iterations = 1000000;

        // Build a string of 1000000 space separated numbers
        for (var n = 0; n < iterations; n++) {
            if (n > 0)
                sb.Append(' ');
            sb.Append(n.ToString());
        }

        string numberString = sb.ToString();

        // Time the process
        sw.Start();
        StringToInts(numberString, iterations);
        //StringToFloats(numberString, iterations);
        sw.Stop();
        long proc1 = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;

        Console.WriteLine("iterations: {0} \t {1}ms", iterations, proc1);
    }

    private unsafe int[] StringToInts(string s, int length) {
        int[] ints = new int[length];
        int index = 0;
        int startpos = 0;

        fixed (char* pStringBuffer = s) {
            fixed (int* pIntBuffer = ints) {
                for (int n=0; n < s.Length; n++) {
                    if (s[n] == ' ') {
                        pIntBuffer[index++] = ParseInt((pStringBuffer + startpos), n - startpos); // int.Parse(new string(pStringBuffer, startpos, n - startpos));
                        startpos = n + 1;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        return ints;
    }

    private unsafe float[] StringToFloats(string s, int length) {
        float[] floats = new float[length];
        int index = 0;
        int startpos = 0;

        fixed (char* pStringBuffer = s) {
            fixed (float* pFloatBuffer = floats) {
                for (int n=0; n < s.Length; n++) {
                    if (s[n] == ' ') {
                        pFloatBuffer[index++] = ParseInt((pStringBuffer + startpos), n - startpos); // int.Parse(new string(pStringBuffer, startpos, n - startpos));
                        startpos = n + 1;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        return floats;
    }

    public static unsafe int ParseInt(char* input, int len) {
        int pos = 0;           // read pointer position
        int part = 0;          // the current part (int, float and sci parts of the number)
        bool neg = false;      // true if part is a negative number

        int* ret = stackalloc int[1];

        while (pos < len && (*(input + pos) > '9' || *(input + pos) < '0') && *(input + pos) != '-')
            pos++;

        // sign
        if (*(input + pos) == '-') {
            neg = true;
            pos++;
        }

        // integer part
        while (pos < len && !(input[pos] > '9' || input[pos] < '0'))
            part = part * 10 + (input[pos++] - '0');

        *ret = neg ? (part * -1) : part;
        return *ret;
    }

            public static unsafe float ParseFloat(char* input, int len) {
        //float ret = 0f;        // return value
        int pos = 0;           // read pointer position
        int part = 0;          // the current part (int, float and sci parts of the number)
        bool neg = false;      // true if part is a negative number

        float* ret = stackalloc float[1];

        // find start
        while (pos < len && (input[pos] < '0' || input[pos] > '9') && input[pos] != '-' && input[pos] != '.')
            pos++;

        // sign
        if (input[pos] == '-') {
            neg = true;
            pos++;
        }

        // integer part
        while (pos < len && !(input[pos] > '9' || input[pos] < '0'))
            part = part * 10 + (input[pos++] - '0');

        *ret = neg ? (float)(part * -1) : (float)part;

        // float part
        if (pos < len && input[pos] == '.') {
            pos++;
            int mul = 1;
            part = 0;
            while (pos < len && !(input[pos] > '9' || input[pos] < '0')) {
                part = part * 10 + (input[pos] - '0');
                mul *= 10; pos++;
            }
            *ret = neg ? *ret - (float)part / (float)mul : *ret + (float)part / (float)mul;
        }

        // scientific part
        if (pos < len && (input[pos] == 'e' || input[pos] == 'E')) {
            pos++;
            neg = (input[pos] == '-'); pos++;
            part = 0;
            while (pos < len && !(input[pos] > '9' || input[pos] < '0')) {
                part = part * 10 + (input[pos++] - '0');
            }
            if (neg)
                *ret /= (float)Math.Pow(10d, (double)part);
            else
                *ret *= (float)Math.Pow(10d, (double)part);
        }

        return (float)*ret;
    }
share|improve this answer

System.Int32.Parse is slowlest, because it used CultureInfo, FormatInfo and etc; and performance reason is not in the temporary strings.

Code from reflection:

private unsafe static bool ParseNumber(ref char* str, NumberStyles options, ref Number.NumberBuffer number, NumberFormatInfo numfmt, bool parseDecimal)
{
    number.scale = 0;
    number.sign = false;
    string text = null;
    string text2 = null;
    string str2 = null;
    string str3 = null;
    bool flag = false;
    string str4;
    string str5;
    if ((options & NumberStyles.AllowCurrencySymbol) != NumberStyles.None)
    {
        text = numfmt.CurrencySymbol;
        if (numfmt.ansiCurrencySymbol != null)
        {
            text2 = numfmt.ansiCurrencySymbol;
        }
        str2 = numfmt.NumberDecimalSeparator;
        str3 = numfmt.NumberGroupSeparator;
        str4 = numfmt.CurrencyDecimalSeparator;
        str5 = numfmt.CurrencyGroupSeparator;
        flag = true;
    }
    else
    {
        str4 = numfmt.NumberDecimalSeparator;
        str5 = numfmt.NumberGroupSeparator;
    }
    int num = 0;
    char* ptr = str;
    char c = *ptr;
    while (true)
    {
        if (!Number.IsWhite(c) || (options & NumberStyles.AllowLeadingWhite) == NumberStyles.None || ((num & 1) != 0 && ((num & 1) == 0 || ((num & 32) == 0 && numfmt.numberNegativePattern != 2))))
        {
            bool flag2;
            char* ptr2;
            if ((flag2 = (((options & NumberStyles.AllowLeadingSign) == NumberStyles.None) ? false : ((num & 1) == 0))) && (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, numfmt.positiveSign)) != null)
            {
                num |= 1;
                ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
            }
            else
            {
                if (flag2 && (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, numfmt.negativeSign)) != null)
                {
                    num |= 1;
                    number.sign = true;
                    ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
                }
                else
                {
                    if (c == '(' && (options & NumberStyles.AllowParentheses) != NumberStyles.None && (num & 1) == 0)
                    {
                        num |= 3;
                        number.sign = true;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        if ((text == null || (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, text)) == null) && (text2 == null || (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, text2)) == null))
                        {
                            break;
                        }
                        num |= 32;
                        text = null;
                        text2 = null;
                        ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        c = *(ptr += (IntPtr)2 / 2);
    }
    int num2 = 0;
    int num3 = 0;
    while (true)
    {
        if ((c >= '0' && c <= '9') || ((options & NumberStyles.AllowHexSpecifier) != NumberStyles.None && ((c >= 'a' && c <= 'f') || (c >= 'A' && c <= 'F'))))
        {
            num |= 4;
            if (c != '0' || (num & 8) != 0)
            {
                if (num2 < 50)
                {
                    number.digits[(IntPtr)(num2++)] = c;
                    if (c != '0' || parseDecimal)
                    {
                        num3 = num2;
                    }
                }
                if ((num & 16) == 0)
                {
                    number.scale++;
                }
                num |= 8;
            }
            else
            {
                if ((num & 16) != 0)
                {
                    number.scale--;
                }
            }
        }
        else
        {
            char* ptr2;
            if ((options & NumberStyles.AllowDecimalPoint) != NumberStyles.None && (num & 16) == 0 && ((ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, str4)) != null || (flag && (num & 32) == 0 && (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, str2)) != null)))
            {
                num |= 16;
                ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
            }
            else
            {
                if ((options & NumberStyles.AllowThousands) == NumberStyles.None || (num & 4) == 0 || (num & 16) != 0 || ((ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, str5)) == null && (!flag || (num & 32) != 0 || (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, str3)) == null)))
                {
                    break;
                }
                ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
            }
        }
        c = *(ptr += (IntPtr)2 / 2);
    }
    bool flag3 = false;
    number.precision = num3;
    number.digits[(IntPtr)num3] = '\0';
    if ((num & 4) != 0)
    {
        if ((c == 'E' || c == 'e') && (options & NumberStyles.AllowExponent) != NumberStyles.None)
        {
            char* ptr3 = ptr;
            c = *(ptr += (IntPtr)2 / 2);
            char* ptr2;
            if ((ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, numfmt.positiveSign)) != null)
            {
                c = *(ptr = ptr2);
            }
            else
            {
                if ((ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, numfmt.negativeSign)) != null)
                {
                    c = *(ptr = ptr2);
                    flag3 = true;
                }
            }
            if (c >= '0' && c <= '9')
            {
                int num4 = 0;
                do
                {
                    num4 = num4 * 10 + (int)(c - '0');
                    c = *(ptr += (IntPtr)2 / 2);
                    if (num4 > 1000)
                    {
                        num4 = 9999;
                        while (c >= '0' && c <= '9')
                        {
                            c = *(ptr += (IntPtr)2 / 2);
                        }
                    }
                }
                while (c >= '0' && c <= '9');
                if (flag3)
                {
                    num4 = -num4;
                }
                number.scale += num4;
            }
            else
            {
                ptr = ptr3;
                c = *ptr;
            }
        }
        while (true)
        {
            if (!Number.IsWhite(c) || (options & NumberStyles.AllowTrailingWhite) == NumberStyles.None)
            {
                bool flag2;
                char* ptr2;
                if ((flag2 = (((options & NumberStyles.AllowTrailingSign) == NumberStyles.None) ? false : ((num & 1) == 0))) && (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, numfmt.positiveSign)) != null)
                {
                    num |= 1;
                    ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
                }
                else
                {
                    if (flag2 && (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, numfmt.negativeSign)) != null)
                    {
                        num |= 1;
                        number.sign = true;
                        ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        if (c == ')' && (num & 2) != 0)
                        {
                            num &= -3;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            if ((text == null || (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, text)) == null) && (text2 == null || (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, text2)) == null))
                            {
                                break;
                            }
                            text = null;
                            text2 = null;
                            ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            c = *(ptr += (IntPtr)2 / 2);
        }
        if ((num & 2) == 0)
        {
            if ((num & 8) == 0)
            {
                if (!parseDecimal)
                {
                    number.scale = 0;
                }
                if ((num & 16) == 0)
                {
                    number.sign = false;
                }
            }
            str = ptr;
            return true;
        }
    }
    str = ptr;
    return false;
}
public static int Parse(string s)
{
    return Number.ParseInt32(s, NumberStyles.Integer, NumberFormatInfo.CurrentInfo);
}

internal unsafe static int ParseInt32(string s, NumberStyles style, NumberFormatInfo info)
{
    byte* stackBuffer = stackalloc byte[1 * 114 / 1];
    Number.NumberBuffer numberBuffer = new Number.NumberBuffer(stackBuffer);
    int result = 0;
    Number.StringToNumber(s, style, ref numberBuffer, info, false);
    if ((style & NumberStyles.AllowHexSpecifier) != NumberStyles.None)
    {
        if (!Number.HexNumberToInt32(ref numberBuffer, ref result))
        {
            throw new OverflowException(Environment.GetResourceString("Overflow_Int32"));
        }
    }
    else
    {
        if (!Number.NumberToInt32(ref numberBuffer, ref result))
        {
            throw new OverflowException(Environment.GetResourceString("Overflow_Int32"));
        }
    }
    return result;
}

private unsafe static void StringToNumber(string str, NumberStyles options, ref Number.NumberBuffer number, NumberFormatInfo info, bool parseDecimal)
{
    if (str == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("String");
    }
    fixed (char* ptr = str)
    {
        char* ptr2 = ptr;
        if (!Number.ParseNumber(ref ptr2, options, ref number, info, parseDecimal) || ((ptr2 - ptr / 2) / 2 < str.Length && !Number.TrailingZeros(str, (ptr2 - ptr / 2) / 2)))
        {
            throw new FormatException(Environment.GetResourceString("Format_InvalidString"));
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. @JonHarrop should measure the performance of using his simpler int parser on a substring version, just to make sure the root cause of the 5x is fully understood. –  fmr Jun 28 '12 at 13:20
    
It's probably a bit of both. In my similar situation I made performance gains from custom integer parsing (because I could assume a single format) and from not cutting up my input string. –  MrKWatkins Jun 28 '12 at 13:34
    
@fmr "@JonHarrop should measure the performance of using his simpler int parser on a substring version, just to make sure the root cause of the 5x is fully understood". Split into substrings takes 0.7s. Split into substrings and map my fast int parser over them takes 0.99s. There are other forces at work here though. –  Jon Harrop Jun 28 '12 at 13:52
    
Ok - then using a "full" parser adapted to work on arbitrary positions in the input string could get you to 2-3x the simple fast parser. Could be worth checking the Mono System.*.Parse and "fixing" their input. –  fmr Jun 28 '12 at 15:18

I've written this one for doubles, that doesn't create a temporary substring. It's meant to be used inside a JSON parser so it limits itself to how doubles can be represented in JSON according to http://www.json.org/.

It's not optimal yet because it requires you to know where the number begins and ends (begin and end parameters), so you'll have to traverse the length of the number twice to find out where it ends. It's still around 10-15x faster than double.Parse and it could be fairly easily modified that it finds the end inside the function which is then returned as an out parameter to know where you have to resume parsing the main string.

Used like so:

Parsers.TryParseDoubleFastStream("1", 0, 1, out j);
Parsers.TryParseDoubleFastStream("2.0", 0, 3, out j);
Parsers.TryParseDoubleFastStream("3.5", 0, 3, out j);
Parsers.TryParseDoubleFastStream("-4.5", 0, 4, out j);
Parsers.TryParseDoubleFastStream("50.06", 0, 5, out j);
Parsers.TryParseDoubleFastStream("1000.65", 0, 7, out j);
Parsers.TryParseDoubleFastStream("-10000.8600", 0, 11, out j);

Code can be found here:

https://gist.github.com/3010984 (would be too lengthy to post here).

And StandardFunctions.IgnoreChar is for my purpose as simple as:

public static bool IgnoreChar(char c)
{
  return c < 33;
}
share|improve this answer

So, are there built-in functions to parse directly from a substring within a string (i.e. using the given start and length of a string) in order to avoid generating a temporary string? If not, are there any libraries that provide efficient functions to do this?

It seems that you want to use a lexing buffer and a lexer, similar to what OCaml can provide with ocamllex and the Lexbuf buffer. (I cannot provide references for F#.)

If your benchmark involving a huge string of integers separated by other tokens is your typical case, it will work well. But in other situations, it could be impractical.

share|improve this answer
    
@user2314737 What do you mean? I did not write a question! –  user40989 Jan 30 at 12:29
    
Sorry, my mistake. Deleting comment. –  user2314737 Jan 30 at 13:53
    
Not really. Lexing will just copy each substring containing an int into its own string. I'd still need to parse those strings into actual ints... –  Jon Harrop Jan 30 at 15:09
    
@JonHarrop You are right of course. I did not have my tea by that time. –  user40989 Jan 30 at 16:41

Not sure if this is any good, but have you tried something like:

var stringValues = input.split(" ");

var intValues = Array.ConvertAll(stringValues, s => int.Parse(s));
share|improve this answer
    
This creates temporary strings; OP didn't want this... –  MrKWatkins Jun 28 '12 at 9:29
3  
Yes, that is even slower than the slow version because you're not only allocating temporary strings but also keeping references to them so you're paying for write barriers and the cost of the GC evacuating them from the nursery generation. –  Jon Harrop Jun 28 '12 at 9:30
    
Question seems to have changed to include an F# implementation... Anyone care to translate the answer? –  Paddy Jun 28 '12 at 9:31
1  
@JonHarrop - did you measure it to be slower? By how much? –  Henk Holterman Jun 28 '12 at 10:05
1  
@HenkHolterman "did you measure it to be slower? By how much?" Yes, of course. Split and map takes 1.65s compared to 1.5s for the incremental map (code given in the question) and 0.3s for the in-line parsing (code also given in the question). –  Jon Harrop Jun 28 '12 at 12:16

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