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Consider the following code snippet:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct Element {
    void SetVisible(bool) { cout << "Called SetVisible on Element" << endl; }
};

struct ElementQuery {
    ElementQuery(Element * e) : element(e) { }
    Element * Get() const { return element; }
    Element * element;
};

namespace A {

static void SetVisible(ElementQuery const& element, bool show) {
    cout << "Called SetVisible on ElementQuery" << endl;
    SetVisible(element.Get(), show);
}

static void SetVisible(Element * element, bool show) {
    element->SetVisible(show);
}

};

int main() {
    Element * e = new Element();
    ElementQuery q(e);
    A::SetVisible(q, true);
    delete e;
    return 0;
}

When run, program fails because of infinite recursion in call SetVisible(element.GetFirst(), show). As I presume that is so because of function SetVisible(Element * element, bool show) is not declared yet at the time of call though it fits overload resolution better.

But when I change namespace A to struct A, recompile and run, everything works fine. Program prints two lines to cout and ends gracefully.

My question is: why does the second call "sees" second declaration of SetVisible and what are the differences between such declarations?

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marked as duplicate by Charles Bailey, Keynslug, Joseph Quinsey, EdChum, Hitham S. AlQadheeb Mar 27 '14 at 11:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Members declared anywhere in a class are visible everywhere in the class. I don't think there's anything more to it than that. –  Steve Jessop Jun 28 '12 at 9:28
3  
Great example why constructor should be explicit. If ElementQuery(Element * e) were explicit the code wouldn't even compile. –  Tomek Jun 28 '12 at 9:39
    
Most upvoted answer to question Charles Bailey referenced made it clear to me. If you make the constructor explicit that Tomek suggests and switch the order of the SetVisible functions in namespace A then it works –  wreckgar23 Jun 28 '12 at 9:43
    
@wreckgar23 @CharlesBailey Ok, now I see, could you elaborate a short answer? And point me what is the reason behind that the scope of struct extended such way. –  Keynslug Jun 28 '12 at 9:51
2  
@wreckgar23: I suspect the feature was added for classes because it's expected that a class is reasonably small compared with an entire program, and so it's reasonably non-confusing for things to be in scope prior to their declaration. The old reason for not having it, inherited from C, is that it would be confusing for the compiler to do multiple passes, but by the time of C++ it's more about confusing the programmer. –  Steve Jessop Jun 28 '12 at 10:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's because the namespace is processed in order and there exists a conversion between Element and ElementQuery (because your constructor is not explicit).

Here is the corrected code

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct Element {
    void SetVisible(bool) { cout << "Called SetVisible on Element" << endl; }
};

struct ElementQuery {
    explicit ElementQuery(Element * e) : element(e) { }
    Element * Get() const { return element; }
    Element * element;
};

namespace A {

static void SetVisible(Element * element, bool show) {
    cout << "Called A::SetVisible on Element" << endl;
    element->SetVisible(show);}

static void SetVisible(ElementQuery const& element, bool show) {
    cout << "Called A::SetVisible on ElementQuery" << endl;
    SetVisible(element.Get(), show);
}

};

int main() {
    Element * e = new Element();
    ElementQuery q(e);
    A::SetVisible(q, true);
    delete e;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

It seems this code should not be compiled at all. Because this call: SetVisible(element.Get(), show); The $void SetVisible(Element * element, bool show) is not visible at moment call. You need to move this function before $void SetVisible(ElementQuery const& element, bool show).

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You could try that. It compiles because ElementQuery has implicit constructor that takes Element * as a parameter. –  Keynslug Jun 28 '12 at 9:47

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