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Let's say we have fields: id | content | updateTime | creationTime

When insertion done both updateTime and creationTime get filled with current time. On update only updateTime field get changed. When I need to find all data created on '2012-06-28' I simply use:

SELECT id, content FROM tbl WHERE creationTime LIKE '2012-06-28%'`

But to get all data that was updated excluding created data I need to use something like this:

SELECT id, content FROM tbl WHERE creationTime LIKE '2012-06-28%' AND creationTime != updateTime

This can't work, obviously. Though I could find all updated data by comparing values of two 'time' collumns inside php, I'd still love to do it inside query.

UPD: Well, it turns out that I was absolutely unaware that sql allows not only compare value of a field with a given variable, number... but also it can compare value of one field with another.

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is that created on the 28th and edited on the 28th but not at the same time as it was created? Wouldnt it be better keeping the updateTime null until there has been an update? –  Nick Maroulis Jun 28 '12 at 9:50
    
Why do you say "This can't work, obviously"? I think it should, although I agree with @marabutt that having updateTime=NULL would perhaps be more semantically correct. (As an aside, to match on date you will find that DATE(creationTime) = '2012-06-28' will be more efficient than your string pattern matching approach). –  eggyal Jun 28 '12 at 10:15
    
@marabutt - INSERT happens only once for each row, UPDATE can happen many times. So I just use updateTime timestamp NOT NULL default CURRENT_TIMESTAMP - this way updateTime gets updated automatically by DB itself. I just need to remember to insert date when record is being created. –  Vitaly Jun 28 '12 at 14:46
    
@eggyal - you're right. Post updated. –  Vitaly Jun 28 '12 at 14:47

3 Answers 3

Use <> instead != (that isn't compatible with some DMBS)

So

SELECT id, content 
FROM tbl 
WHERE creationTime LIKE '2012-06-28%' AND creationTime <> updateTime

If you want some documentation you can find here

However, your query have to work properly with !=

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Why mySQL? He didn't mention which DB he is using. –  Hallucynogenyc Jun 28 '12 at 9:51
    
@Hallucynogenyc : take a look to the tags that he used –  DonCallisto Jun 28 '12 at 9:51
    
Sorry never used mySQL myself, just PostgreSQL, how did you know? :) –  Hallucynogenyc Jun 28 '12 at 10:11
    
The documentation to which you link suggests that both <> and != are valid inequality operators. Why would your proposed change make any difference? –  eggyal Jun 28 '12 at 10:13
    
@eggyal They are the same, but != is supported only by some DMBS so, if you have to "export" that query in a different "language", you have to modify it –  DonCallisto Jun 28 '12 at 10:20

Only change the not operator from != to <>

SELECT id, content FROM tbl WHERE creationTime LIKE '2012-06-28%' AND creationTime <> updateTime
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Doesn't MySQL support both forms for the inequality operator? –  eggyal Jun 28 '12 at 10:13

Your query is correct (on mySQL¹), don't know why would you think otherwise

¹ <> is the SQL operator for not equal. Some implementations of it (PostgreSQL or MySQL for instance), however, accept != too. It is a good practice to always use <> to avoid problems if you ever use your code on a different database.

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Doesn't MySQL support both forms for the inequality operator? –  eggyal Jun 28 '12 at 10:14
    
There's a difference between the SQL specification and the implementations that exists nowadays. MySQL might support things that aren't on the specification but that won't work on other SQL compilant databases. –  Hallucynogenyc Jun 28 '12 at 10:20
    
Agreed, but given that this question was tagged mysql, how does this answer the OP's question? –  eggyal Jun 28 '12 at 10:21

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