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I'm having problems with duplicate objects of the same entity within a single context when using two managed object contexts.

Consider the following code:

[childMOC performBlockAndWait:^{

    // CREATE PERSON IN CHILD MOC
    Person *person = [NSEntityDescription insertNewObjectForEntityForName:@"Person" 
                                                   inManagedObjectContext:childMOC];

    person.name = @"Ben";

    // SAVE CHILD MOC TO PUSH CHANGES TO MAIN MOC
    [childMOC save:nil];

    NSManagedObjectID *personID = person.objectID;

    [mainMOC performBlockAndWait:^{
        // SAVE MAIN MOC TO PERSIST THE PERSON AND REPLACE ID TO PERMANENT
        [mainMOC save:nil];

        // GET THE PERSON IN THE MAIN MOC
        Person *personInMainContext = (Person*)[mainMOC objectWithID:personID];

        // GET THE PERSON'S NEW PERMANENT ID
        NSManagedObjectID *personIdAfterSaveToPersistentStore = personInMainContext.objectID;

        [childMOC performBlockAndWait:^{

            // GET THE PERSON IN THE CHILD MOC WITH ITS NEW PERMANENT ID
            // (this is common when sending the id from mainMOC to childMOC)
            Person *samePersonFetchedFresh = (Person*)[childMOC objectWithID:personIdAfterSaveToPersistentStore];

            // THE PERSON OBJECTS SHOULD BE EXACTLY THE SAME BECAUSE THE MOC GUARANTEES UNIQUING
            samePersonFetchedFresh.name = @"Jerry";
            NSLog(@"%@ & %@", person.name, samePersonFetchedFresh.name);

            // OUTPUT: Ben & Jerry
            // NOT THE SAME?!
        }];
    }];
}];

This means that an object created in the child MOC loose its uniquing ability when it has been saved in the main MOC / persistent store.

Can anyone explain why uniquing doesn't work in this situation?

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I'll try to push changes from the most inner block to the main one (save the main block). Then, I think, you will see the uniquinq behaviour. –  flexaddicted Jun 28 '12 at 10:59
    
The uniquing behavior is already broken as I got two objects referring to the same entity. So the problem has already happened. –  thejaz Jun 28 '12 at 11:08
    
Hi thejaz, did you manage to solve the issue? –  Dmitry Makarenko Jul 10 '12 at 18:13
    
No, not in a good way. Using NSManagedObjectContextDidSaveNotification to come around the problem, but it is not perfect. –  thejaz Jul 12 '12 at 12:48
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3 Answers

Try refreshing your person before logging its name. I think the uniquing works but cache invalidation might not.

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I know that it will print "Jerry & Jerry" if I refresh the person object before printing to the log, but the fact that there are two different objects means the uniquing don't work. Even if I refresh, person still has the temporary ID while samePersonFetchedFresh has the permanent one. That is weird as well, shouldn't it update the temporary to the permanent one when refreshing? –  thejaz Jun 28 '12 at 13:05
    
Well it could, but it is not designed to. Since changes with nested contexts are propagated only from child -> parent context. It is up to the developer to refresh the child context if there are changes to the parent context directly. –  svena Jun 28 '12 at 14:11
    
But that is what I'm doing when I call to refresh the object, and even so it does not update the ID. –  thejaz Jun 28 '12 at 14:17
    
Ah, you mean the temporary ID is retained through refresh, I see your point. Although you should never reference Core Data objects from outside by their temporary ID, since they are well just that... temporary. –  svena Jun 28 '12 at 14:20
    
Let's be clear on one thing though. There are still one object at any given point of time even though one of the references shows an out-of-date temporary ID. I wonder if you tried to access it by that temporary ID again, would that succeed. I doubt it, but it's possible. So in that sense the uniquing works. It's just that you cannot rely on the objectID solely to check for duplicates if you pass them around like that. –  svena Jun 28 '12 at 14:24
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Somewhere, you should listen to the main context NSManagedObjectContextDidSaveNotification, and propagate the changes to the child context(es) using mergeChangesFromContextDidSaveNotification.

If a complete merge do not suits your needs, you can also update each entity individually with refreshObject:mergeChanges:.

One way or another, you have to propagate the changes if you do not want to deal with up to date instances and old copies.

This is not done automatically, and this is for the good as the operation can be quite heavy. You have to handle the merges when appropriate, for the relevant contextes. Per example if you're populating your database using some JSON service, you'll use a context to add entities to the database, and you'll want to update the UI when the data is consistent and not each time you save something to the main context and maybe to the disk as well. Likewise, that context is most certainly not interested in the changes made in the UI then saved to the main context / disk. So then, the process is not automatic.

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This does not apply to new concurrency types and nested managed object contexts introduced in iOS5. –  svena Jun 28 '12 at 14:13
    
I already do that now to come around the problem with duplicate objects. But all objects changed/added in the childMOC that I have pushed to the mainMOC by saving, they will bounce back and be refetched in the childMOC because of this. That's why I don't want to do like that and I really want the uniquing to work so I can remove this NSManagedObjectContextDidSaveNotification + mergeChangesFromContextDidSaveNotification solution. –  thejaz Jun 28 '12 at 14:13
    
Added a word about refreshObject:mergeChanges: –  fabrice truillot de chambrier Jun 28 '12 at 14:20
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

My solution was to:

1) Use the background MOC as the parent MOC and the main MOC as a child. As a bonus I don't need to save the main MOC to get the permanent IDs.

[DC.backgroundMOC performBlock:^{
    // Add, save and update managed objects
    [DC saveContext]; // The changes is being pushed to the main context
}];

2) Use NSManagedObjectContextDidSaveNotification to keep the main MOC up to date (the main MOC is updating the UI)

- (void) backgroundMOCSaved:(NSNotification*)notification {
    [mainMOC performBlock:^{
        [mainMOC mergeChangesFromContextDidSaveNotification:notification];
    }];
}
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