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I begin a transaction in vb.net. I execute a stored procedure on SQL Server 2008. That stored procedure contains BEGIN TRANSACTION. It fails, and ROLLBACK in CATCH block runs...

BEGIN CATCH

    IF @@TRANCOUNT > 1 ROLLBACK
        EXEC p_RethrowError

END CATCH

Rethrow effectively does a 'raiserror'.

Execution passes back to vb.net. Rollback in "Catch sqlException " executes.

Questions:

  • Why is @@TRANCOUNT 1 rather than 2? (i.e. how come begin trans in vb.net is not included?)

  • Why does ROLLBACK in SQL not rollback client trans as well (but a rollback in client does rollback SQL Server)?

And finally, in vb.net, if you try to rollback transaction twice within client, you get exception "transaction has completed". Is there anyway of knowing whether the transaction has completed, or is still pending? Thanks.

----------- VB.Net Code

Public Sub sub1(ByVal intID As Integer, ByVal intValue as integer, ByVal intAuditUser As Int16)

Dim objConn As New SqlConnection(GetDBaseConnectionString())

    objConn.Open()

    '***** start the transaction ************************************************
    Dim objTrans As SqlTransaction = objConn.BeginTransaction()

    Try

        Call sub2(objTrans, intID, intValue, intAuditUser)

        '***** commit the transaction ************************************************
        objTrans.Commit()

    Catch es As SqlException
        objTrans.Rollback()
        Throw es

    Catch ex As Exception
        '***** rollback the transaction ************************************************
        objTrans.Rollback()
        Throw ex

    Finally
        If objConn.State <> ConnectionState.Closed Then objConn.Close()
    End Try

End Sub

Private Sub Sub2(ByVal objTrans As SqlTransaction, ByVal intID As Integer, ByVal intValue as integer, ByVal intAuditUser As Int16)

    Dim objParams As New List(Of SqlParameter)

        SqlHelper.AddInParameter(objParams, "ID", SqlDbType.Int, intID)
        SqlHelper.AddInParameter(objParams, "Value", SqlDbType.Int, intValue)
        SqlHelper.AddInParameter(objParams, "AuditUser", SqlDbType.SmallInt, intAuditUser)

        '* save details
        SqlHelper.ExecuteNonQuery(objTrans, CommandType.StoredProcedure, "p_StoredProc_UpdateSomething", objParams.ToArray)

End Sub
share|improve this question
    
please add a code sample showing how you begin the transaction in vb.net –  Jim McKeon Jun 28 '12 at 15:33
    
rollback is not a method on the transactionscope class so I don't know how you're "rolling back twice within client" –  Jim McKeon Jun 28 '12 at 15:43
    
Sorry, didnt make myself clear - in this particular example im not rolling back client; however, I try to write defensive code, and was wondering if theres such as statement as "if transaction.pending then rollback". But only in terms of defensive coding, just in case, for whatever reason, another routine somewhere else had already rollbacked (but not in this instance). –  Doctor Chris Chris Jun 29 '12 at 9:58
    
@JimMcKeon code added. –  Doctor Chris Chris Jun 29 '12 at 10:02
    
meant to say, in this particular example im not rolling back client "twice" –  Doctor Chris Chris Jun 29 '12 at 13:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why is @@TRANCOUNT 1 rather than 2? (i.e. how come begin trans in vb.net is not included?)

It is 2. That's how it is documented, and if it wasn't 2, the server side ROLLBACK would not execute.

Why does ROLLBACK in SQL not rollback client trans as well (but a rollback in client does rollback SQL Server)?

There are no separate client side transactions. It is all the same server side transaction and ROLLBACK always rolls back the transaction regardless of the current @@TRANCOUNT value and regardless of where the rollback was initiated.

And finally, in vb.net, if you try to rollback transaction twice within client, you get exception "transaction has completed".

The implementation of SqlTransaction.Rollback is pretty complicated, has different paths for zombie transactions, pre-SQL Server 2005 and post-SQL Server 2005, and for example the original pre-2005 path executes a simple Rollback call thus:

IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0 ROLLBACK TRANSACTION

...and the SqlTransaction client side object additionally enters a zombie mode, which is why you have seen the error after you subsequently attempted to execute ROLLBACK on the same SqlTransaction object once again.

The code path on SQL Server 2008 is similar except that it is not based on human readable SQL anymore.

This explains why you only get the error with second and subsequent calls to SqlTransaction.Rollback, even though the rollback was already irrevocably initiated inside the stored procedure.

Is there anyway of knowing whether the transaction has completed, or is still pending?

Yes. See here for a way:

Gets the SqlConnection object associated with the transaction, or null if the transaction is no longer valid.

If can therefore test like this:

if (myTransaction.Connection != null) ...
share|improve this answer
    
That is very helpful. You are right, @@trancount is 2. In fact, strangely enough, when I do NOT have a begintrans in the stored proc (but one in client), @@trancount is still 2 for some reason. Regarding rollback (one in client and one in server) - I understand what you mean about not begin rollback in client: I mean, as you know anyway, rollback invoked in Client. What I mean is, if stored proc does two rollbacks, you get an exception on 2nd one, however I do not think a rollback invoked in SP followed by a rollback invoked in client causes the same exception. Anyway, all good, thanks. –  Doctor Chris Chris Jul 4 '12 at 16:21
1  
@DoctorChrisChris - You are correct. The client does not know of the rollback in SP (the client SqlTransaction object can not go to zombie mode). After you call the client side rollback, it immediately goes into zombie mode, and so you cannot call the client side rollback twice. –  Jirka Hanika Jul 4 '12 at 16:35
    
That explains it, thanks. any thoughts on @@Trancount=2 for a storeproc without a begin tran? –  Doctor Chris Chris Jul 4 '12 at 16:45
    
@DoctorChrisChris - I'd expect 1, you observed 2, and this guy reports seeing 0. Anyway, one thing to watch for here are implicit transactions. –  Jirka Hanika Jul 4 '12 at 16:56
    
thankx, v interesting. –  Doctor Chris Chris Jul 5 '12 at 12:45

Hey Doctor Chris Chris,

Admittedly, this doesn't have a lot to do with your initial question. However, after reading your comment as to how to begin a transaction in vb.net. This might help:

Dim sqlUpdate As New StringBuilder 'use this to build your insert/update statements
sqlUpdate.Append("SQLCODE")
Dim cnADO As SqlClient.SqlConnection = yourDataBaseStuff.getConnection("targetServer", cnADO)
Dim trans As SqlTransaction = Nothing
Dim sqlCmdUpdate As New SqlCommand(sqlUpdate.ToString, cnADO)
sqlCmdUpdate.Parameters.AddWithValue("@X", new_x) 'where @X is your stored procedure variable, and new_x is what you would like to pass in


' Build Transaction, associate commands
trans = cnADO.BeginTransaction
cmdLoad.Transaction = trans
cmdLoad.CommandText = "Transaction stuff"
cmdLoad.ExecuteNonQuery()
sqlCmdUpdate.Transaction = trans
sqlCmdUpdate.ExecuteNonQuery()
trans.Commit()

Hope that gets you started off in a better direction!

-sf

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Sacredfaith; we used to do stuff similar to that, but now we just use enterprise libraries sqlhelper now (see code): makes things much easier and quicker –  Doctor Chris Chris Jun 29 '12 at 10:02

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