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The bitwise complement operator does unexpected things for bool operands. The program below produces this output:

x: 123456fe   ~x: 87654301   !x: 556677ff
x: 123456ff   ~x: 87654301   !x: 556677fe

For any byte value in X, ~X seems to always overwrite the entire byte with 01. !X, however, seems to complement only the LSB of the byte...

I guess this makes sense if the bool is being converted to an int, the bitwise complement is applied, and the result is converted back to a bool. BUT, I don't get why one result would write 8 bits to memory and the other writes only 1 bit.

#include "stdio.h"

typedef union {
    bool b;
    unsigned int i;
} ib_T; 

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    ib_T x, y, z;

    x.i = 0x123456fe;
    y.i = 0x876543ff;
    z.i = 0x55667777;

    y.b = ~x.b;
    z.b = !x.b;
    printf("x: %08x   ~x: %08x   !x: %08x\n", x.i, y.i, z.i);

    x.i = 0x123456ff;
    y.b = ~x.b;
    z.b = !x.b;
    printf("x: %08x   ~x: %08x   !x: %08x\n", x.i, y.i, z.i);
}
share|improve this question

Reading from a member of the union to which you have not previously assigned is undefined behavior.

In a union, at most one of the non-static data members can be active at any time, that is, the value of at most one of the non-static data members can be stored in a union at any time.

There is an exception to this rule when types share a common layout, which does not apply in your case. Generally, if you assign to x.i, then you can read only from x.i; if you would like to start reading from x.b, you need to assign to x.b first.

I guess this makes sense if the bool is being converted to an int, the bitwise complement is applied, and the result is converted back to a bool.

This is 100% correct: the snippet below

bool b;
b = false;
printf("b: %d\n", b);
b = ~b;
printf("~b: %d\n", b);
b = ~b;
printf("~~b: %d\n", b);

prints

b: 0
~b: 1
~~b: 1

bool is promoted to int, tilde ~ is applied, and then the result is converted back to bool using the usual "zero / not zero" rule.

share|improve this answer
    
a link to an explanation page about undefined behaviour and nasal demons would be nice – Vlad Jun 28 '12 at 13:31
    
@Vlad Wikipedia articles link to the C and C++ standard documents. – Alexey Frunze Jun 28 '12 at 13:35

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