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My code isn't really that relevant but just to give you background, I have a method that opens an instance of a window messageWindow like this;

private void SetMessagePosition(Controls.Button btn, string text)
        {
            messageWindow = new messageWindow(text);
            relativePoint = btn.TransformToAncestor(this).Transform(new Point(0, 0));

            messageWindow.Left = relativePoint.X + this.Left;
            messageWindow.Top = relativePoint.Y + this.Top;
            messageWindow.Show();
        }

But I want to see if I can use this method to open other windows as well. This obviously means passing it the name of the new window I want to open as a parameter. My question is, how? I have tried passing parameters like so;

private void SetMessagePosition(Window newWin, Controls.Button btn, string text))
        {
            newWin = new newWin(text);
            ...

Where newWin = the type of window I want to open. But obviously the new newWin part throws an error because VS doesn't know of a window called newWin.

I know your first thought might be, why not just instantiate the windows before calling this method, then I can skip this line all together. Well this method actually sets the position of the new window relative to the parent window at it's time of opening, ergo, I can't have set it's position before now.

Another thing I thought to try was;

List<Window> winList;
List<Type> winListType;

winList.Add(window1);
winList.Add(window2);
winList.Add(window3);

winListType.Add(Window1);
winListType.Add(Window2);
winListType.Add(Window3);

SetMessagePosition(winList[2], winListType[2], btn1, "Yes");

private void SetMessagePosition(Window newWin, Type newWinType, Controls.Button btn, string text))
        {
            newWin = new newWinType(text);
            ...

But newWinType does not like being passed a Type and not a variable, even though it is a list of Type. I would be very impressed if anyone knew a way/workaround to do this.

share|improve this question
    
to be more flexible I advice using an interface instead of Window and Type – HichemSeeSharp Jun 28 '12 at 13:33
    
@HichemC Apologies, but I have no knowledge of Interfaces. Will read up on them now. – windowskm Jun 28 '12 at 13:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to make it a generic method so you can pass the type:

private void SetMessagePosition<T>(Controls.Button btn, string text) where T : Window, new()
{
    T window = new T();
    relativePoint = btn.TransformToAncestor(this).Transform(new Point(0, 0));
    window.Left = relativePoint.X + this.Left;
    window.Top = relativePoint.Y + this.Top;
    window.Show();
}

Then, you can call it like this:

SetMessagePosition<messageWindow>(btn, text);

However, the downfall to that approach is that you can't pass anything into the constructor when you are instantiating an object via a generic type. So, you'd need to set the text on the window in a different way such as creating an interface that has a SetText method, or something like that, and that could be added as another constraint on the generic type.

You could simplify this whole mess by simply expecting the new window to already be instantiated and passed into the method rather than having the method instantiate it itself:

private void SetMessagePosition(Window window, Controls.Button btn)
{
    relativePoint = btn.TransformToAncestor(this).Transform(new Point(0, 0));
    window.Left = relativePoint.X + this.Left;
    window.Top = relativePoint.Y + this.Top;
    window.Show();
}

Then, you could just call it like this:

SetMessagePosition(new newWin(text), btn);
share|improve this answer
    
So I'm using what you have above but it points to my initialiser line and errors "Cannot create an instance of the variable type 'T' because it does not have the new() constraint". Any ideas? – windowskm Jun 28 '12 at 13:54
    
I'm wondering if it might have something to so with stackoverflow.com/questions/980629/… – windowskm Jun 28 '12 at 14:04
    
I fixed my example by adding the new() constraint so that type T is forced to be able to be instantiated with the new keyword with a parameterless constructor. Unfortunately, your window takes the text in it's constructor, so that would have to be done a different way. – Steven Doggart Jun 28 '12 at 14:13
    
Oh so no passing parameters? :/ That's annoying. – windowskm Jun 28 '12 at 14:16
    
Ah! instantiate them in the method call, no idea I could do that. Much simpler too. Thanks :D – windowskm Jun 28 '12 at 14:30

by using an interface like this one :

interface IWindow
    {
        int Left
        {
            get;
            set;
        }
        int Right
        {
            get;
            set;
        }
    void ShowWindow();
}

Then implement it in all of your windows whatever what type it is.

 public partial class MainWindow : Window , IWindow
    {
        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

        }



        public new int Left
        {
            get
            {
                return Left;
            }
            set
            {
                Left = value;
            }
        }

        public int Right
        {
            get
            {
                return Right;
            }
            set
            {
                Left = value;
            }
        }

        public void ShowWindow()
        {
            Show();
        }
    }

Then change you parameter to IWindow like this :

private void SetMessagePosition(IWindow window, Controls.Button btn, string text))
        {
share|improve this answer
    
But how does IWindow relate to XAML? – windowskm Jun 28 '12 at 13:44
    
by window properties you need to change. – HichemSeeSharp Jun 28 '12 at 13:51
    
As in I must do my designing in C#? I already have much of it done in XAML. – windowskm Jun 28 '12 at 13:58
    
This option could well have worked, just I don't know enough about Interfaces. Will definitely look into them more though. +1 Thanks! – windowskm Jun 28 '12 at 14:31
    
I really really advice you to do so, although SteveDog's answer using generics is pretty much simple and effective. – HichemSeeSharp Jun 28 '12 at 16:23

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