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Ok so this question has been bothering me for some time. I'm running a module that connects to a database and returns values from a query. I have a script calling the module and attempting to return the value from the subroutine of the module. But since code is better than words here's what I have:

sub selectCustomerName ($code){
    connectDB() or die "Failed in subroutine";
    #Selects customer name from customer table where code is $code
    my $selectName = "SELECT * FROM customers WHERE code = ?";
    my $sth = $dbh->prepare($selectName);
    $sth->execute($code);
my $hash = $sth->fetchrow_hashref;
$hash->{customer_name} = $name;
return $name;
$sth ->finish();
$dbh->disconnect();
}

That's my module, here's my script:

#!/usr/bin/perl
require Connect;
use warnings;
my $dbh = Connect::connectDB();
my $results = Connect::selectCustomerName('38d');
print $results;

From a lot of messing around and switching variables I've got it to print 0, and the hash reference but never the actual value of the hash. Any help would be great thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are some mistakes. Try this:

use strict; use warnings; # never forget this 2 pragmas
use Data::Dumper; # print what's inside data structures or object

sub selectCustomerName {
    my $code = shift; # or my ($code) = @_; 

    connectDB() or die "Failed in subroutine";
    #Selects customer name from customer table where code is $code
    my $selectName = "SELECT * FROM customers WHERE code = ?";
    my $sth = $dbh->prepare($selectName);
    $sth->execute($code);
    my $hash = $sth->fetchrow_hashref;
    print Dumper $hash;
    $name = $hash->{customer_name};
    $sth ->finish();
    $dbh->disconnect();
    return $name;
}
  • if you put finish() & disconnect() after the return, they will never be invoked.
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1  
Perl Prototypes (sub selectCustomerName ($code){) are not a syntax error, but a way to specify what arguments a method expects. However, unlike many other programming languages, the parameters are not automatically filled in: you still need to get them out of @_, for example by doing shift. –  Konerak Jun 28 '12 at 13:49
    
Thanks for the speedy response. I still run into a problem with the printing though. It gives me "Use of uninitialized value in print" from my script. That makes me think there's a problem with what's being returned, any ideas? –  Jeff MacQuarrie Jun 28 '12 at 13:50
    
You do mean my $name = $hash->{customer_name} instead of $hash->{customer_name} = $name; right? –  Konerak Jun 28 '12 at 13:50
    
Yes... thanks you two –  Jeff MacQuarrie Jun 28 '12 at 13:52
1  
sub fu() { } would declare and define a sub with an empty prototype that returns nothing. If it's seen after first use, perl will tell you the prototype has no effect. Prototypes in Perl don't do what prototypes in other languages might do. Don't use them if you don't specifically need and know the functionality. As for sub selectCustomerName ($code){}, that's not a valid Perl prototype. –  Sinan Ünür Jun 28 '12 at 13:53

Simplest way to see what you actually have is probably to use Data::Dumper.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

require Connect;
use Data::Dumper;

my $dbh = Connect::connectDB();
my $results = Connect::selectCustomerName('38d');
print Dumper $results;

But if you have a hash reference then you can deference it using %{$hash_ref} and use it as you use any other hash.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

require Connect;

my $dbh = Connect::connectDB();
my $results = Connect::selectCustomerName('38d');

foreach (keys %{$results}) {
  say "Key: $_, Value: $results->{$_}";
}
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Dumper is definitely easier, but it seemed easier to format using the other method. And I did try dereferencing it in one of my many attempts but it printed nothing. Probably due to errors in my module code. –  Jeff MacQuarrie Jun 28 '12 at 14:04

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