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I need an XML-serializable dictionary. Actually, I now have two quite different programs that need one. I was rather surprised to see that .NET doesn't have one. I asked the question elsewhere and got sarcastic responses. I don't understand why it's a stupid question.

Can someone enlighten me, given how dependent various .NET features are on XML serialization, why there isn't an XML-serializable dictionary. Hopefully, you can also explain why some people consider that a daft question. I guess I must be missing something fundamental and I'm hoping you'll be able to fill in the gaps.

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5  
The question is incorrect, because it gets cause and effect wrong. It should be, "why XmlSerializer cannot serialize dictionaries"? Because there are many ways to do XML serialization in .NET, and most of them serialize dictionaries just fine (DataContractSerializer, SoapFormatter ...). –  Pavel Minaev Sep 9 '09 at 6:29
    
I'm guessing you haven't examined "XmlDictionaryWriter.CreateDictionaryWriter"... or the 100 other ways to serialize dictionaries in .NET (some of them are built-in). ...Also why do you need a dictionary? I've always found strong typed objects to work better, why not just implement a class with a [DataContract], and IExtensibleDataObject? –  BrainSlugs83 Sep 29 '13 at 1:35
    
Which modern features in .NET do you think are dependent on XML Serialization? Config files do not use serialization, and ASMX web services are only meant for legacy use. (moved to comment from answer) –  John Saunders Jan 23 at 16:55

7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The thing about XML Serialization is that it's not just about creating a stream of bytes. It's also about creating an XML Schema that this stream of bytes would validate against. There's no good way in XML Schema to represent a dictionary. The best you could do is to show that there's a unique key.

You can always create your own wrapper, for instance One Way to Serialize Dictionaries.

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My two cases are web services and configuration files. So, you're saying that the .NET Framework guys were limited by a deficiency in the XML Schema specification? I have found stuff online but using a built-in class in a lot less work than deciding if someone else has done it right. I'll have a look at the one you suggested. –  serialhobbyist Jul 14 '09 at 12:23
    
ASMX web services are now considered legacy technology. See johnwsaundersiii.spaces.live.com/blog/…. There's an entire API for configuration files - it doesn't use XML Serialization. Anything else? –  John Saunders Jul 14 '09 at 12:45
    
BTW, the "limitation" is a design decision. As you say, it was used for web services - but not just to serialize and deserialize - it's what produced the schemas that are part of the WSDL. It's all part of a whole, and it all has to work together. –  John Saunders Jul 14 '09 at 12:46
    
I know they're legacy but that doesn't mean that I am going to be given the time to learn WCF. Someone noted that software shouldn't be gold-plated, it should do the job. ASMX does the job. The pace of Microsoft's development of .NET is exciting and wonderful but out of touch with the current market: training budgets slashed, cutting back, only doing work that MUST be done. The non-IT parts of the business look askance when we say "We need to upgrade because Microsoft won't be supporting technology X any more". (I know it's not just MS but it is OFTEN MS.) So I'm stuck with ASMX for now. –  serialhobbyist Jul 14 '09 at 14:06
    
You said that "given how dependent various .NET features are on XML serialization" you couldn't understand why there wasn't one. I said there are few features of .NET dependent on XML Ser. You mentioned ASMX and Config. I said ASMX is legacy and config doesn't use XML Ser. "Legacy" was meant to show why they'd be in no hurry to add dictionary support. Also, see johnwsaundersiii.spaces.live.com/blog/…. –  John Saunders Jul 14 '09 at 14:11

I know this has been answered before, but since I have a very concise way (code) for doing IDictionary serialization with the DataContractSerializer class (used by WCF, but could and should be used anywhere) I couldn't resist contributing it here:

public static class SerializationExtensions
{
    public static string Serialize<T>(this T obj)
    {
        var serializer = new DataContractSerializer(obj.GetType());
        using (var writer = new StringWriter())
        using (var stm = new XmlTextWriter(writer))
        {
            serializer.WriteObject(stm, obj);
            return writer.ToString();
        }
    }
    public static T Deserialize<T>(this string serialized)
    {
        var serializer = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(T));
        using (var reader = new StringReader(serialized))
        using (var stm = new XmlTextReader(reader))
        {
            return (T)serializer.ReadObject(stm);
        }
    }
}

This works perfectly in .NET 4 and should also work in .NET 3.5, although I didn't test it yet.

UPDATE: It doesn't work in .NET Compact Framework (not even NETCF 3.7 for Windows Phone 7) as the DataContractSerializer is not supported!

I did the streaming to string because it was more convenient to me, although I could have introduced a lower-level serialization to Stream and then used it to serialize to strings, but I tend to generalize only when needed (just like premature optimization is evil, so it is premature generalization...)

Usage is very simple:

// dictionary to serialize to string
Dictionary<string, object> myDict = new Dictionary<string, object>();
// add items to the dictionary...
myDict.Add(...);
// serialization is straight-forward
string serialized = myDict.Serialize();
...
// deserialization is just as simple
Dictionary<string, object> myDictCopy = 
    serialized.Deserialize<Dictionary<string,object>>();

myDictCopy will be a verbatim copy of myDict.

You'll also notice that the generic methods provided will be able to serialize any type (to the best of my knowledge) since it is not limited to IDictionary interfaces, it can be really any generic type T.

Hope it helps someone out there!

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2  
Works great! To other developers: You'll need to add a project reference for System.Runtime.Serialization if you don't already have one, but it is available in the .NET 4.0 Client Profile. –  MCattle Aug 2 '12 at 22:34
    
It did not work with Windows Phone 8 SDK targeting Windows Phone 7.5 (which is Silverlight 3). –  Adarsha Feb 3 '13 at 4:52
    
@Adarsha Per the DataContractSerializer documentation it supports the following platforms: Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 7, Windows Vista SP2, Windows Server 2008 (Server Core Role not supported), Windows Server 2008 R2 (Server Core Role supported with SP1 or later; Itanium not supported)... It doesn't mention the phone SDK... The Windows Phone 7 uses .NET Compact Framework 3.7, thus no DataContractSerializer :-( I've updated the post accordingly so people do not loose time figuring out what didn't work! Thanks Adarsha! –  Loudenvier Apr 12 '13 at 0:29
    
I don't know why I didn't see this before, but -1 for using new XmlTextWriter and new XmlTextReader instead of XmlReader.Create and XmlWriter.Create. –  John Saunders Jan 23 at 16:52
    
@JohnSaunders why would I do that when I know already which XmlReader or Writer I want. Did you take a look at XmlWriter/Reader.Create? There is a heft penalty for calling it, and this method should be as fast as possible as it can be used in a tight loop serializing lots of objects (I concede I would use another serialization method if performance was the issue here though). But anyway, the recommended way is to use XmlWriter/Reader.Create, but since I'm programming .NET from the onset (version 1) I guess I'm used to do some things the "old" way. –  Loudenvier Jan 24 at 21:16

They added one in .NET 3.0. If you can, add a reference to System.Runtime.Serialization and look for System.Xml.XmlDictionary, System.Xml.XmlDictionaryReader, and System.Xml.XmlDictionaryWriter.

I would agree that it is not in a particularly discoverable place.

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4  
These classes are not general-purpose serializable dictionaries. They're related to the implementation of serialization in WCF. –  John Saunders Jul 14 '09 at 10:46
    
I don't understand the commment. Why AREN'T they general-purpose xml-serializable dictionaries? What part of "System.Xml.XmlDictionary" or "System.Runtime.Serialization" indicates non-genericness? –  Robin Davies Jan 27 at 11:42

Use the DataContractSerializer! See the sample below.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;
using System.Xml;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            A a = new A();
            a.Value = 1;

            B b = new B();
            b.Value = "SomeValue";

            Dictionary<A, B> d = new Dictionary<A,B>();
            d.Add(a, b);
            DataContractSerializer dcs = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(Dictionary<A, B>));
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            using (XmlWriter xw = XmlWriter.Create(sb))
            {
                dcs.WriteObject(xw, d);
            }
            string xml = sb.ToString();
        }
    }

    public class A
    {
        public int Value
        {
            get;
            set;
        }
    }

    public class B
    {
        public string Value
        {
            get;
            set;
        }
    }
}

The above code produces the following xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-16"?>
<ArrayOfKeyValueOfABHtQdUIlS xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/2003/10/Serialization/Arrays">
    <KeyValueOfABHtQdUIlS>
        <Key xmlns:d3p1="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/ConsoleApplication1">
            <d3p1:Value>1</d3p1:Value>
        </Key>
        <Value xmlns:d3p1="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/ConsoleApplication1">
            <d3p1:Value>SomeValue</d3p1:Value>
        </Value>
    </KeyValueOfABHtQdUIlS>
</ArrayOfKeyValueOfABHtQdUIlS>
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Create one of your own :-), the readonly feature is bonus but if you need a key other than a string then the class needs some modifications...

namespace MyNameSpace
{
    [XmlRoot("SerializableDictionary")]
    public class SerializableDictionary : Dictionary<String, Object>, IXmlSerializable
    {
        internal Boolean _ReadOnly = false;
        public Boolean ReadOnly
        {
            get
            {
                return this._ReadOnly;
            }

            set
            {
                this.CheckReadOnly();
                this._ReadOnly = value;
            }
        }

        public new Object this[String key]
        {
            get
            {
                Object value;

                return this.TryGetValue(key, out value) ? value : null;
            }

            set
            {
                this.CheckReadOnly();

                if(value != null)
                {
                    base[key] = value;
                }
                else
                {
                    this.Remove(key);
                }               
            }
        }

        internal void CheckReadOnly()
        {
            if(this._ReadOnly)
            {
                throw new Exception("Collection is read only");
            }
        }

        public new void Clear()
        {
            this.CheckReadOnly();

            base.Clear();
        }

        public new void Add(String key, Object value)
        {
            this.CheckReadOnly();

            base.Add(key, value);
        }

        public new void Remove(String key)
        {
            this.CheckReadOnly();

            base.Remove(key);
        }

        public XmlSchema GetSchema()
        {
            return null;
        }

        public void ReadXml(XmlReader reader)
        {
            Boolean wasEmpty = reader.IsEmptyElement;

            reader.Read();

            if(wasEmpty)
            {
                return;
            }

            while(reader.NodeType != XmlNodeType.EndElement)
            {
                if(reader.Name == "Item")
                {
                    String key = reader.GetAttribute("Key");
                    Type type = Type.GetType(reader.GetAttribute("TypeName"));

                    reader.Read();
                    if(type != null)
                    {
                        this.Add(key, new XmlSerializer(type).Deserialize(reader));
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        reader.Skip();
                    }
                    reader.ReadEndElement();

                    reader.MoveToContent();
                }
                else
                {
                    reader.ReadToFollowing("Item");
                }

            reader.ReadEndElement();
        }

        public void WriteXml(XmlWriter writer)
        {
            foreach(KeyValuePair<String, Object> item in this)
            {
                writer.WriteStartElement("Item");
                writer.WriteAttributeString("Key", item.Key);
                writer.WriteAttributeString("TypeName", item.Value.GetType().AssemblyQualifiedName);

                new XmlSerializer(item.Value.GetType()).Serialize(writer, item.Value);

                writer.WriteEndElement();
            }
        }

    }
}
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There was a bug in this code -- if there was whitespace in the xml the reading could enter an infinite loop. I fixed this bug but there may be more. –  Luke Sep 24 '10 at 17:35

This is my implementation.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Xml.Serialization;
using System.Xml.Schema;
using System.Xml;

namespace Rubik.Staging
{    
    [XmlSchemaProvider("GetInternalSchema")]
    public class SerializableDictionary<TKey, TValue> : Dictionary<TKey, TValue>, IXmlSerializable
    {
        #region IXmlSerializable Members

        private const string ns = "http://www.rubik.com.tr/staging";

        public static XmlQualifiedName GetInternalSchema(XmlSchemaSet xs)
        {
            bool keyIsSimple = (typeof(TKey).IsPrimitive || typeof(TKey) == typeof(string));
            bool valueIsSimple = (typeof(TValue).IsPrimitive || typeof(TValue) == typeof(string));

            XmlSchemas schemas = new XmlSchemas();

            XmlReflectionImporter importer = new XmlReflectionImporter(ns);
            importer.IncludeType(typeof(TKey));            
            importer.IncludeType(typeof(TValue));            

            XmlTypeMapping keyMapping = importer.ImportTypeMapping(typeof(TKey));            
            XmlTypeMapping valueMapping = importer.ImportTypeMapping(typeof(TValue));          

            XmlSchemaExporter exporter = new XmlSchemaExporter(schemas); 

            if(!keyIsSimple)
                exporter.ExportTypeMapping(keyMapping);
            if(!valueIsSimple)
                exporter.ExportTypeMapping(valueMapping);

            XmlSchema schema = (schemas.Count == 0 ? new XmlSchema() : schemas[0]);

            schema.TargetNamespace = ns;          
            XmlSchemaComplexType type = new XmlSchemaComplexType();
            type.Name = "DictionaryOf" + keyMapping.XsdTypeName + "And" + valueMapping.XsdTypeName;
            XmlSchemaSequence sequence = new XmlSchemaSequence();
            XmlSchemaElement item = new XmlSchemaElement();
            item.Name = "Item";

            XmlSchemaComplexType itemType = new XmlSchemaComplexType();            
            XmlSchemaSequence itemSequence = new XmlSchemaSequence();

            XmlSchemaElement keyElement = new XmlSchemaElement();

            keyElement.Name = "Key";
            keyElement.MaxOccurs = 1;
            keyElement.MinOccurs = 1;

            XmlSchemaComplexType keyType = new XmlSchemaComplexType();
            XmlSchemaSequence keySequence = new XmlSchemaSequence();
            XmlSchemaElement keyValueElement = new XmlSchemaElement();
            keyValueElement.Name = keyMapping.ElementName;
            keyValueElement.SchemaTypeName = new XmlQualifiedName(keyMapping.XsdTypeName, keyMapping.XsdTypeNamespace);
            keyValueElement.MinOccurs = 1;
            keyValueElement.MaxOccurs = 1;
            keySequence.Items.Add(keyValueElement);
            keyType.Particle = keySequence;
            keyElement.SchemaType = keyType;
            itemSequence.Items.Add(keyElement);


            XmlSchemaElement valueElement = new XmlSchemaElement();

            valueElement.Name = "Value";
            valueElement.MaxOccurs = 1;
            valueElement.MinOccurs = 1;

            XmlSchemaComplexType valueType = new XmlSchemaComplexType();
            XmlSchemaSequence valueSequence = new XmlSchemaSequence();
            XmlSchemaElement valueValueElement = new XmlSchemaElement();
            valueValueElement.Name = valueMapping.ElementName;
            valueValueElement.SchemaTypeName = new XmlQualifiedName(valueMapping.XsdTypeName, valueMapping.XsdTypeNamespace);
            valueValueElement.MinOccurs = 1;
            valueValueElement.MaxOccurs = 1;
            valueSequence.Items.Add(valueValueElement);
            valueType.Particle = valueSequence;
            valueElement.SchemaType = valueType;
            itemSequence.Items.Add(valueElement);
            itemType.Particle = itemSequence;
            item.SchemaType = itemType;            
            sequence.Items.Add(item);
            type.Particle = sequence;
            schema.Items.Add(type);

            xs.XmlResolver = new XmlUrlResolver();
            xs.Add(schema);

            return new XmlQualifiedName(type.Name, ns);
        }





        public void ReadXml(System.Xml.XmlReader reader)
        {
            XmlSerializer keySerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TKey));
            XmlSerializer valueSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TValue));

            bool wasEmpty = reader.IsEmptyElement;
            reader.Read();

            if (wasEmpty)
                return;

            while (reader.NodeType != System.Xml.XmlNodeType.EndElement)
            {
                reader.ReadStartElement("Item");

                reader.ReadStartElement("Key");
                TKey key = (TKey)keySerializer.Deserialize(reader);
                reader.ReadEndElement();

                reader.ReadStartElement("Value");
                TValue value = (TValue)valueSerializer.Deserialize(reader);
                reader.ReadEndElement();

                this.Add(key, value);

                reader.ReadEndElement();

                reader.MoveToContent();
            }

            reader.ReadEndElement();
        }

        public void WriteXml(System.Xml.XmlWriter writer)
        {
            XmlSerializer keySerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TKey));
            XmlSerializer valueSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TValue));

            foreach (TKey key in this.Keys)
            {
                writer.WriteStartElement("Item");

                writer.WriteStartElement("Key");
                keySerializer.Serialize(writer, key);
                writer.WriteEndElement();

                writer.WriteStartElement("Value");
                TValue value = this[key];
                valueSerializer.Serialize(writer, value);
                writer.WriteEndElement();

                writer.WriteEndElement();
            }
        }

        #endregion

        #region IXmlSerializable Members

        public XmlSchema GetSchema()
        {
            return null;
        }

        #endregion
    }

}
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4  
You should comment on the advantages of using your more verbose solution over those that were proposed elsewhere in this thread. It is not immediately clear why one should use this over a more simple implementation. –  Renaud Bompuis Jun 14 '11 at 1:43

A generic helper to quickly add IXmlSerializable to any (existing) Dictionary without using inheritance:

using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Serialization;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace GameSpace {

    public class XmlSerializerForDictionary {

        public struct Pair<TKey,TValue> {

            public TKey Key;
            public TValue Value;

            public Pair(KeyValuePair<TKey,TValue> pair) {
                Key = pair.Key;
                Value = pair.Value;
            }//method

        }//struct

        public static void WriteXml<TKey,TValue>(XmlWriter writer, IDictionary<TKey,TValue> dict) {

            var list = new List<Pair<TKey,TValue>>(dict.Count);

            foreach (var pair in dict) {
                list.Add(new Pair<TKey,TValue>(pair));
            }//foreach

            var serializer = new XmlSerializer(list.GetType());
            serializer.Serialize(writer, list);

        }//method

        public static void ReadXml<TKey, TValue>(XmlReader reader, IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dict) {

            reader.Read();

            var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(List<Pair<TKey,TValue>>));
            var list = (List<Pair<TKey,TValue>>)serializer.Deserialize(reader);

            foreach (var pair in list) {
                dict.Add(pair.Key, pair.Value);
            }//foreach

            reader.Read();

        }//method

    }//class

}//namespace

And a convenient serializable generic dictionary:

using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Schema;
using System.Xml.Serialization;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace GameSpace {

    public class SerializableDictionary<TKey,TValue> : Dictionary<TKey,TValue>, IXmlSerializable {

        public virtual void WriteXml(XmlWriter writer) {
            XmlSerializerForDictionary.WriteXml(writer, this);
        }//method

        public virtual void ReadXml(XmlReader reader) {
            XmlSerializerForDictionary.ReadXml(reader, this);
        }//method

        public virtual XmlSchema GetSchema() {
            return null;
        }//method

    }//class

}//namespace
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