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I need to take the first N rows for each group, ordered by custom column.

Given the following table:

db=# SELECT * FROM xxx;
 id | section_id | name
----+------------+------
  1 |          1 | A
  2 |          1 | B
  3 |          1 | C
  4 |          1 | D
  5 |          2 | E
  6 |          2 | F
  7 |          3 | G
  8 |          2 | H
(8 rows)

I need the first 2 rows (ordered by name) for each section_id, i.e. a result similar to:

 id | section_id | name
----+------------+------
  1 |          1 | A
  2 |          1 | B
  5 |          2 | E
  6 |          2 | F
  7 |          3 | G
(5 rows)

I am using PostgreSQL 8.3.5.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 62 down vote accepted

New solution (Postgres 8.4)

SELECT
  * 
FROM (
  SELECT
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY session_id ORDER BY name) AS r,
    t.*
  FROM
    xxx t) x
WHERE
  x.r <= 2;
share|improve this answer
7  
This works with PostgreSQL 8.4 too (window functions start with 8.4). –  Bruno Mar 2 '12 at 15:48
2  
Too good to use his example :) –  Justin Thomas Oct 10 '13 at 22:34
    
This is definitely the right answer - Mind blown –  dineth Nov 9 '14 at 21:22
    
Textbook answer to do grouped limit –  piggybox Jan 6 at 22:57

Here's another solution.

SELECT
  *
FROM
  xxx a
WHERE (
  SELECT
    COUNT(*)
  FROM
    xxx
  WHERE
    section_id = a.section_id
  AND
    name <= a.name
) <= 2
share|improve this answer
SELECT  x.*
FROM    (
        SELECT  section_id,
                COALESCE
                (
                (
                SELECT  xi
                FROM    xxx xi
                WHERE   xi.section_id = xo.section_id
                ORDER BY
                        name, id
                OFFSET 1 LIMIT 1
                ),
                (
                SELECT  xi
                FROM    xxx xi
                WHERE   xi.section_id = xo.section_id
                ORDER BY 
                        name DESC, id DESC
                LIMIT 1
                )
                ) AS mlast
        FROM    (
                SELECT  DISTINCT section_id
                FROM    xxx
                ) xo
        ) xoo
JOIN    xxx x
ON      x.section_id = xoo.section_id
        AND (x.name, x.id) <= ((mlast).name, (mlast).id)
share|improve this answer
    
I am getting: ERROR: syntax error at or near "JOIN" –  Kouber Saparev Jul 14 '09 at 12:16
    
@Kouber: see post update –  Quassnoi Jul 14 '09 at 12:29
    
The query is very close to the one I need, except that it is not showing sections with less than 2 rows, i.e. the row with ID=7 isn't returned. Otherwise I like your approach. –  Kouber Saparev Jul 14 '09 at 15:29
    
@Kouber: see post update –  Quassnoi Jul 14 '09 at 15:35
    
Thank you, I just came to the same solution with COALESCE, but you were faster. :-) –  Kouber Saparev Jul 14 '09 at 15:41
        -- ranking without WINDOW functions
-- EXPLAIN ANALYZE
WITH rnk AS (
        SELECT x1.id
        , COUNT(x2.id) AS rnk
        FROM xxx x1
        LEFT JOIN xxx x2 ON x1.section_id = x2.section_id AND x2.name <= x1.name
        GROUP BY x1.id
        )
SELECT this.*
FROM xxx this
JOIN rnk ON rnk.id = this.id
WHERE rnk.rnk <=2
ORDER BY this.section_id, rnk.rnk
        ;

        -- The same without using a CTE
-- EXPLAIN ANALYZE
SELECT this.*
FROM xxx this
JOIN ( SELECT x1.id
        , COUNT(x2.id) AS rnk
        FROM xxx x1
        LEFT JOIN xxx x2 ON x1.section_id = x2.section_id AND x2.name <= x1.name
        GROUP BY x1.id
        ) rnk
ON rnk.id = this.id
WHERE rnk.rnk <=2
ORDER BY this.section_id, rnk.rnk
        ;
share|improve this answer
    
CTEs and Window functions were introduced with the same version, so I don't see the benefit of the first solution. –  a_horse_with_no_name Dec 7 '12 at 20:56
    
The post is three years old. Besides, there may still be implementations that lack them (nudge nudge say no more). It could also be considered an exercise in old-fashoned querybuilding. (though CTEs are not very old-fashoned) –  wildplasser Dec 7 '12 at 21:00
    
The post is tagged "postgresql" and the PostgreSQL version that introduced CTEs also introduced windowing functions. Hence my comment (I did see it's that old - and PG 8.3 did have neither) –  a_horse_with_no_name Dec 7 '12 at 21:01
    
The post mentions 8.3.5, and I believe they were introduced in 8.4. Besides: it is also good to know about alternative scenarios, IMHO. –  wildplasser Dec 7 '12 at 21:03
    
That's exactly what I mean: 8.3 neither had CTEs nor windowing functions. So the first solution won't work on 8.3 –  a_horse_with_no_name Dec 7 '12 at 21:05

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