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This is going to be a stupid question but I have spent an inordinate amount of time trying to remove the AJAX part from the jQuery validation plugin function below but still have the validation work. Suffice to say I haven't succeeded.

$(document).ready(function(){
$("#myform").validate({
    debug: false,
    rules: {
        group: {required: true}, 
    },
    messages: {
        group: {required: " Choose a group."},
    },
    submitHandler: function(form) {
        $('#results').html('Loading...');
        $.post('', $("#myform").serialize(), function(data) {
            $('#results').html(data);
        });
    }
});
});

So yeah, I'm dumb. Can anyone help me out?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you want to remove it, is it because you wish to redirect them to another page? –  Ohgodwhy Jun 28 '12 at 13:55
    
I've been using the function throughout my site as it's been perfect. But now I'm in a situation where I actually just want it to follow the "action='mynewpage.php'" in the form HTML. But I want to keep the validation. –  AzzyDude Jun 28 '12 at 13:59
    
Check out my answer @AzzyDude –  Praveen Kumar Jun 28 '12 at 13:59
    
@AzzyDude My recommendation will be in the form of a new answer. –  Ohgodwhy Jun 28 '12 at 14:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you send the object back, send it as a JSON object.

Here's an example where we're going to use the serialized elements, conditionalize some data, and then send something back with our new page.

<?php
  $name = $_POST['name'];
  $email = $_POST['email'];
  $phone = $_POST['phone'];
  if(isset($name) && isset($email) && isset($phone)){
    return json_encode(array('filled' => 'yes', 'loc' => 'newpage.php'));
  }

?>

Then in the validator, we can parse data.loc to the window.location to mimic the redirect.

$(document).ready(function(){
  $("#myform").validate({
    debug: false,
    rules: {
      group: {required: true}, 
    },
    messages: {
      group: {required: " Choose a group."},
    },
    submitHandler: function(form) {
      $('#results').html('Loading...');
      $.post('', $("#myform").serialize(), function(data) {
        if(data.filled == 'yes'){
          window.location = data.loc;
        }

      });
    }
  });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I'm unfamiliar with JSON. I'm just trying to access what the user enters into the form using the POST method (e.g. $_POST['example']) in PHP? –  AzzyDude Jun 28 '12 at 14:12
    
When you send the $('#myform').serialize() over, you don't have to do anything special. If you have fields named things like -> field_1, field_2, field_3, you simply access them in php with the same name, $_POST['field_1'], $_POST['field_2'], $_POST['field_3'] you don't have to do anything tricky there. Just when you output any data, make it into a JSON object so that we can access it like I said above. –  Ohgodwhy Jun 28 '12 at 14:14
    
@AzzyDude you'll see I've created the conditional check in the php file, sent the data back as an object, it has two properties, filled and loc. When we access the data object in the function(data) of the post, it uses intelligent parsing to understand that it's JSON we're working with. ow we can use data.filled and data.loc to get the values of the keys filled and loc that we made in our PHP file. –  Ohgodwhy Jun 28 '12 at 14:18
    
Okay, I think I understand now. Man, I thought this problem would be a simple matter of replacing one line of my code... –  AzzyDude Jun 28 '12 at 14:32

You just need to replace the submitHandler function!

submitHandler: function(form) {
    $('#results').html('Loading...');
    // $.post('', $("#myform").serialize(), function(data) {
    //     $('#results').html(data);
    // });
}

And after calling .validate(), call the .valid() function on #myform this way:

$('#myform').valid();

Just make sure you are removing the default action of submit on the form by adding this:

<form onsubmit="if (!$(this).valid()) return false;">

Explanation: This doesn't submit the form when it is not valid and shows the errors. If the form is valid, this function submits as a normal form submit.

But why do you wanna do that? What else you wanna do?

share|improve this answer
    
I just want it to go to the next page like it normally would. I'm just trying to avoid writing new validation for the form. –  AzzyDude Jun 28 '12 at 14:02
    
Yeah, thats what this script does. See the explanation. Hope it helps... :) –  Praveen Kumar Jun 28 '12 at 14:05
    
Hmm, I did what you asked but the validation seems to have stopped working. Can you just copy and paste the entire function in case I put something in the wrong place? –  AzzyDude Jun 28 '12 at 14:09
    
Which validation plugin are you using? I am using jQuery.validate. Okay, can you make a fiddle of what you have now? I will update it and add it in the answer. The concept is simple. If form is valid, submit. If not, show the errors! :) –  Praveen Kumar Jun 28 '12 at 14:11
    

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