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I'm generating HTML dynamically using Delphi strings (Delphi XE). What is the correct way to encode accentuated characters into my HTML?

var
 s : string;
 myHTML : string;

(...)
s:= 'programação';
 myHTML:= 
'<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">'+#10+
'<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">'+#10+
(...)
'<title>OmneeK Server - Intraweb</title>'+#10+
'<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />'+#10+
(...)

myHTML:= myHTML + '<font color="red">' + s + '</font>';

(...)

with the above code I get (from the browser):

"programa��o"

I've tried with HTMLEncode but the result is the same. I'm using ICS components to handle the HTTP requests.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm generating a runtime string and returning the string as a response to a HTTP Server component (ICS). Is it possible to apply TEncoding into a string?

Yes. A Delphi String is a UnicodeString in XE. Delphi has had native support for UTF-8 encoded strings since D2009.

One thing you can do is simply assign the original UnicodeString to a UTF8String variable and let the RTL encode the Unicode data to UTF-8 for you, then you can send the raw bytes of the UTF8String to the client:

var 
  myHTML: string;  
  myHTMLUtf8: UTF8String; 

myHTML := ...
myHTMLUtf8 := myHTML;
// send myHTMLUtf8 as-is...

Another option is to send the UTF-8 data as a TStream. You can place a UTF8String into a TMemoryStream:

var 
  myHTML: string;  
  myHTMLUtf8: UTF8String;
  strm: TMemoryStream;

myHTML := ...
myHTMLUtf8 := myHTML;

strm := TMemoryStream.Create;
strm.Write(myHTMLUtf8[1], Length(myHTMLUtf8) * SizeOf(AnsiChar));
strm.Position := 0;
// send strm as-is...
strm.Free;

Or place the original UnicodeString into a TStringStream with TEncoding.UTF8 applied to it:

var 
  myHTML: string;  
  strm: TStringStream;

myHTML := ...

strm := TStringStream.Create(myHTML, TEncoding.UTF8);
// send strm as-is...
strm.Free;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I believe this is the cleanest approach to the problem. Regarding the ICS HTTPServer component, they provide a AnswerStream too, so the stream approach will work. The UTF8String won't unless you use a UTF8ToAnsiStr conversion and then the performance will suffer from the double conversion. –  Miguel E Jun 28 '12 at 21:37
    
UTF8ToAnsiStr() would only make sense if the HTTPServer makes you assign an AnsiString for output. And in fact, in XE, System.Utf8ToAnsi() decodes a UTF8String back to a UnicodeString, so it would not be worth using a UTF8String at all, unless you use the TStream appraoch, or send the UTF8String bytes manually. –  Remy Lebeau Jun 28 '12 at 23:16

It seems which you are not saving the page in UTF-8 encoding

Try this sample

Var
  Page :  TStrings;
begin
  Page:=TStringList.Create;
  try
    Page.Add('<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" dir="ltr" lang="en">');
    Page.Add('<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset="UTF-8" />');
    Page.Add('<title>Test</title>');
    Page.Add('<p>programação</p>');
    Page.Add('</html>');
    Page.SaveToFile(ChangeFileExt(ParamStr(0),'.html'), TEncoding.UTF8);
  finally
    Page.Free;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but I'm not saving the dynamic page into a file. I'm generating a runtime string and returning the string as a response to a HTTP Server component (ICS). Is it possible to apply TEncoding into a string? –  Miguel E Jun 28 '12 at 16:51
    
Are you tried setting the content-type of the response to text/html charset=UTF-8? Also add these details and code (about ...returning the string as a response to a HTTP Server component) to your question to get better answers. –  RRUZ Jun 28 '12 at 17:07
    
I am (as you can see above). I've found out that there is a function under HTTPUtil named HTMLEscape and this one does what I need. This function should work just like HTMLEncode (in HTTPApp unit) but it doesn't. Ive checked some comments and it seems that Embarcadero has left it behind. The official documentation has nothing about it. I don't know if this is the most efficient solution but the correct accentuation is now shown by the browser. –  Miguel E Jun 28 '12 at 17:16
1  
When I say ..try adding to the response the content-type text/html charset=UTF-8 I mean to the component which send the data (as part of the HTTP header) , anyway if the HTMLEscape function fix your issue post that as an answer. –  RRUZ Jun 28 '12 at 17:23

Be sure to save your file with UTF8 encoding. For example, with a MyHTML variable as a TStringList

MyHTML.SaveToFile(HTMLFileName, TEncoding.UTF8);

It works for my application, with nothing more than a TStringList and this line of code.

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Thank you, but I'm doing this without generating a file. Is it possible to include this encoding into a string? –  Miguel E Jun 28 '12 at 16:52

@Miguel E

I've discovered something interesting with Delphi XE4 / Indy 10 (probably applies to earlier versions too). Could this lie at the root of your problem?

If you write to TIdHTTPResponseInfo.ContentType AFTER you have written to TIdHTTPResponseInfo.CharSet, then you lose what you wrote to TIdHTTPResponseInfo.CharSet!

In other words:(given Info:TIdHTTPResponseInfo)

  Info.ContentType := 'text/html';   // Warning!  Setting this AFTER setting CharSet changes CharSet back to ISO8859-1.
  Info.CharSet := 'UTF-8';           // So we MUST set CharSet last!

In fact, there is NOTHING else you have to do (other than write to Info.ContentText) in order to make UTF-8 encoding of (say) Chinese characters work. You actually do not need to resort to using a stream. Any Chinese (or other Unicode-dependent languages) written to an ordinary Delphi string will work when assigned to TIdHTTPResponseInfo.ContentText if the CharSet property has not been accidentally undone.

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Shame it doesn't tell you this in the documentation –  Alex T Sep 1 '13 at 21:12
1  
The Charset property did not exist yet when the documentation was last updated. There is a lot of newer functionality that is not documented yet. –  Remy Lebeau Sep 1 '13 at 21:36

After posting this question I've found out that there are some issues with the HTMLEncode function (found in the HTTPApp unit), and that the HTMLEscape function (found in the HTTPUtil unit) does the same. The documentation doesn't say much but after retrying with the HTMEscape function the browser displayed the correct accentuation.

I don't know if there is a better way to solve this.

share|improve this answer
    
Reading all the answers, it's odd nobody points to the actual problem: in UTF8 (files, but also HTTP responses) the data should start with a byte order mark. For UTF8 this is #$EF#$BB#$BF, but using TStringStream.Create(myHTML, TEncoding.UTF8); does that for you. –  Stijn Sanders Jun 29 '12 at 15:55

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