Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why if I convert a date from milliseconds to days, and then back, from days to milliseconds, this date change?

for example:

SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");
Date date = format.parse("2012-06-02");
System.out.println(date);
Long dateAsDays = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toDays(date.getTime());

System.out.println(
    new Date(
        TimeUnit.DAYS.toMillis(dateAsDays)
    ) );

will be printed:

Sat Jun 02 00:00:00 GMT+03:00 2012

Fri Jun 01 03:00:00 GMT+03:00 2012

How I can save the day of the month in this conversion? And why this code is not working properly?

share|improve this question
1  
For Date/Time issues, you should use Joda project, it provides easy ways to handle Date, Time and Timestamp operations. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jun 28 '12 at 14:18
1  
If you have the choice, use JODA instead of the built-in Java date facilities, which are more than a little broken. –  Louis Wasserman Jun 28 '12 at 14:18
    
Thanks for the advice to use Joda –  Kot4 Jun 29 '12 at 7:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The date becomes less accurate when you get it in days. You are in GMT+3, so 12:00 GMT is 3:00 for you. From the TimeUnit class reference:

convert

public long convert(long sourceDuration, TimeUnit sourceUnit)

Convert the given time duration in the given unit to this unit. Conversions from finer to coarser granularities truncate, so lose precision. For example converting 999 milliseconds to seconds results in 0. Conversions from coarser to finer granularities with arguments that would numerically overflow saturate to Long.MIN_VALUE if negative or Long.MAX_VALUE if positive. For example, to convert 10 minutes to milliseconds, use: TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.convert(10L, TimeUnit.MINUTES)

share|improve this answer
    
The usage of this method lead a problem that arises in example. Guess, usage of 'TimeUnit' tool does not allow the required transformation. –  Kot4 Jun 29 '12 at 7:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.