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How can I get a list of unique values in a array, do I always have to use a second array is there something similar to a java hashmap in javascript?

I am going to be using Javascript and jQuery only. No additional libraries can be used.

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1  
stackoverflow.com/questions/5381621/… - describes exactly what you want I think? –  SpaceBison Jun 28 '12 at 14:24
1  
are you open to using the underscore.js library? –  jakee Jun 28 '12 at 14:29
    
a java hashmap is basically the same as a javascript object. syntax is {"key": "value", "key2": "value2"} –  Ian Jun 28 '12 at 14:29

8 Answers 8

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Since I went on about it in the comments for @Rocket's answer, I may as well provide an example that uses no libraries. This requires two new prototype functions, contains and unique

Array.prototype.contains = function(v) {
    for(var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        if(this[i] === v) return true;
    }
    return false;
};

Array.prototype.unique = function() {
    var arr = [];
    for(var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        if(!arr.contains(this[i])) {
            arr.push(this[i]);
        }
    }
    return arr; 
}

You can then do:

var duplicates = [1,3,4,2,1,2,3,8];
var uniques = duplicates.unique(); // result = [1,3,4,2,8]

For more reliability, you can replace contains with MDN's indexOf shim and check if each element's indexOf is equal to -1: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/indexOf

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Thanks for the examples. Ill be using them to filter options for a select box. This should work well. –  Astronaut Jun 28 '12 at 16:10
    
~a.indexOf(b) === (a.indexOf(b) == -1) –  Orwellophile Jan 9 '14 at 11:54

Or for those looking for a one-liner (simple and functional):

var a = ["1", "1", "2", "3", "3", "1"];
var unique = a.filter(function(item, i, ar){ return ar.indexOf(item) === i; });
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Thanks for this, quite elegant –  FelipeKM Oct 30 '14 at 15:39
    
It's almost copy paste from kennebec, but admittedly passing the array as a parameter rather than using the closure will probably improve performance. –  nus Jan 4 at 21:10
    
- must say I did not connect the dots, simply scanned through for a one liner, looked like a large post so skipped, went and found an alternative source and re-posted for others to find quickly. That said, your right; pretty much the same as kennebec. –  Josh Mc Jan 4 at 22:34
    
but isnt there a performance hit here? of O(n^2)? –  Ranganath Govardhanagiri Jan 19 at 12:29

If you want to leave the original array intact,

you need a second array to contain the uniqe elements of the first-

Most browsers have Array.prototype.filter:

var unique= array1.filter(function(itm, i){
    return array1.indexOf(itm)== i; 
    // returns true for only the first instance of itm
});


//if you need a 'shim':
Array.prototype.filter= Array.prototype.filter || function(fun, scope){
    var T= this, A= [], i= 0, itm, L= T.length;
    if(typeof fun== 'function'){
        while(i<L){
            if(i in T){
                itm= T[i];
                if(fun.call(scope, itm, i, T)) A[A.length]= itm;
            }
            ++i;
        }
    }
    return A;
}
 Array.prototype.indexOf= Array.prototype.indexOf || function(what, i){
        if(!i || typeof i!= 'number') i= 0;
        var L= this.length;
        while(i<L){
            if(this[i]=== what) return i;
            ++i;
        }
        return -1;
    }
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@Rocket- thanks! –  kennebec Jun 28 '12 at 14:53

Using jQuery, here's an Array unique function I made:

Array.prototype.unique = function () {
    var arr = this;
    return $.grep(arr, function (v, i) {
        return $.inArray(v, arr) === i;
    });
}

console.log([1,2,3,1,2,3].unique()); // [1,2,3]
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2  
if you're going to use jQuery inside a core javascript object's prototype, might it not be better to write a jQuery function, such as $.uniqueArray(arr)? Embedding references to jQuery within Array's prototype seems questionable –  jackwanders Jun 28 '12 at 14:38
1  
@jackwanders: What's so questionable about it? If you got jQuery on the page, let's use it. –  Rocket Hazmat Jun 28 '12 at 14:40
    
Just that the new unique function you wrote is now dependent on jQuery; you can't move it to a new site or app without ensuring that jQuery is in use there. –  jackwanders Jun 28 '12 at 14:45
1  
that was my point; if you're going to use jQuery, then make the function itself part of jQuery. If I were going to extend the prototype of a core object, I'd stick to core javascript, just to keep things reusable. If someone else is looking at your code, it's obvious that $.uniqueArray is reliant on jQuery; less obvious that Array.prototype.unique is as well. –  jackwanders Jun 28 '12 at 14:47
1  
@jackwanders: I guess. I use this in my code, as I always use jQuery, and I just like extending prototypes. But, I understand your point now. I'll leave this here anyway. –  Rocket Hazmat Jun 28 '12 at 14:48

i have inbuilt JQuery Unique function.

uniqueValues= jQuery.unique( duplicateValues );

For more you can refer to the jquery API Documentations.

http://api.jquery.com/jquery.unique/

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Note that this only works on arrays of DOM elements, not strings or numbers. -- quote from documentation. –  mco Feb 8 at 22:56

Not native in Javascript, but plenty of libraries have this method.

Underscore.js's _.uniq(array) (link) works quite well (source).

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The only problem with the solutions given so far is efficiency. If you are concerned about that (and you probably should) you need to avoid nested loops: for * for, filter * indexOf, grep * inArray, they all iterate the array multiple times. You can implement a single loop with solutions like this or this

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I was just thinking if we can use linear search to eliminate the duplicates:

JavaScript:
function getUniqueRadios() {

var x=document.getElementById("QnA");
var ansArray = new Array();
var prev;


for (var i=0;i<x.length;i++)
  {
    // Check for unique radio button group
    if (x.elements[i].type == "radio")
    {
            // For the first element prev will be null, hence push it into array and set the prev var.
            if (prev == null)
            {
                prev = x.elements[i].name;
                ansArray.push(x.elements[i].name);
            } else {
                   // We will only push the next radio element if its not identical to previous.
                   if (prev != x.elements[i].name)
                   {
                       prev = x.elements[i].name;
                       ansArray.push(x.elements[i].name);
                   }
            }
    }

  }

   alert(ansArray);

}

HTML:

<body>

<form name="QnA" action="" method='post' ">

<input type="radio"  name="g1" value="ANSTYPE1"> good </input>
<input type="radio" name="g1" value="ANSTYPE2"> avg </input>

<input type="radio"  name="g2" value="ANSTYPE3"> Type1 </input>
<input type="radio" name="g2" value="ANSTYPE2"> Type2 </input>


<input type="submit" value='SUBMIT' onClick="javascript:getUniqueRadios()"></input>


</form>
</body>
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