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Given that I have this resultset structure (superfluous fields have been stripped)

Id | ParentId | Name | Depth
----------------------------

is it possible to have the records returned in tree order i.e. Parent then Children, if a Child is a Parent, then their Children, if not then Sibling, etc? For example,

Id | ParentId | Name | Depth
----------------------------
1    NULL       Major    1
2    1          Minor    2
3    1          Minor    2
4    3          Build    3
5    3          Build    3
6    1          Minor    2

/* etc, etc */

The only way that I can think of doing this would be to follow this article -

Improve hierarchy performance using nested sets

and include [LeftExtent] and [RightExtent] fields against each record. Now the SQL in the article works fine when Ids are unique, but in this particular tree structure, a record with the same Id can appear in different places within the tree (the ParentId field is different, obviously). I think the problem is in this SQL from the article -

  INSERT INTO @tmpStack
    (
      EmployeeID, 
      LeftExtent
    )
  SELECT TOP 1 EmployeeID, @counter 
  FROM Employee 
  WHERE ISNULL(ParentID, 0) = ISNULL(@parentid,0) 
  /* If the Id has already been added then record is not given [LeftExtent] or [RightExtent] values. */
  AND EmployeeID NOT IN (SELECT EmployeeID FROM @tmpStack)

How can this be altered to allow records with duplicate Ids to be given [LeftExtent] and [RightExtent] values, or I am completely missing an easier way to return the resultset in the order that I require?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here's one that does the trick for me:

@ParentID is just a starting point in the hierarchy, but you can pass in 0 (but I think you're using null as the base ID, so you'll get the idea)

The key to ordered sorting is with the sort key that's built up.

WITH RoleHierarchy (RoleID, [Role], [Description], ParentID, Editable, HierarchyLevel, SortKey) AS
(
   -- Base
   SELECT
        RoleID,
        [Role],
        [Description],
        ParentID,
        Editable,
        0 as HierarchyLevel,
        CAST(RoleID AS VARBINARY(300))
   FROM
        dbo.Roles       
   WHERE
        RoleID = @ParentID

   UNION ALL

   -- Recursive
   SELECT
        e.RoleID,
        e.[Role],
        e.[Description],
        e.ParentID,
        e.Editable,
        th.HierarchyLevel + 1 AS HierarchyLevel,
        CAST (th.SortKey + CAST (e.[Role] AS VARBINARY(100)) + CAST (e.[RoleID] AS VARBINARY(100)) AS VARBINARY(300))
   FROM
        Roles e
        INNER JOIN RoleHierarchy th ON e.ParentID = th.RoleID
    WHERE
        e.RoleID != 0
)

SELECT
    RoleID,
    ParentID,
    [Role],
    [Description],
    Editable,
    HierarchyLevel
FROM
    RoleHierarchy
WHERE
    RoleID != @ParentID
ORDER BY
    SortKey
share|improve this answer
    
Tests on the resultset suggest this works well :) –  Russ Cam Jul 14 '09 at 15:10
    
Well, let me know if you notice anything strange as I've been using this for a while! –  ScottE Jul 14 '09 at 16:56
    
your solution works great, i use seq (sequence) column instead of primary key and it works. I also found more detailed sortkey explanation here sqlservercentral.com/articles/Development/… –  giosakti Oct 19 '11 at 5:29

You should have a look at recursive common table expressions in SQL Server 2005:

In your case, this would be something like:

WITH EmployeeCTE AS
(
   -- get the anchor
   SELECT ID, ParentID, Name, 0 as 'Depth'
   FROM Employee WHERE ParentID IS NULL

   -- recursively union lower levels
   UNION ALL
   SELECT e.ID, e.ParentID, e.Name, e.Depth+1
   FROM Employee e
   INNER JOIN EmployeeCTE ON e.ParentID = EmployeeCTE.ID
)
SELECT * FROM EmployeeCTE

This should give you a nice query result set with the data you're looking for. Or am I missing something?

Marc

share|improve this answer
    
I have a CTE currently to recursively join records to build the resultset. This works fine, but the problem is that the order of records in the resultset is not in the order I would like as specified in the question. I'll amend the question to state resultset structure as opposed to table structure –  Russ Cam Jul 14 '09 at 11:18

If you used materialized path or HIERARCHYID, you life would be much easier...

share|improve this answer
    
HIERARCHYID looks interesting, but alas, the solution is to work with SQL Server 2005 –  Russ Cam Jul 14 '09 at 15:07
    
Materialized path does work on 2005, and it can make your life much eaiser –  A-K Jul 14 '09 at 16:12

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