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I have a wrapper class around some objects that I want to use as keys in a Hash. The wrapped and unwrapper objects should map to the same key.

A simple example will be this:

class A
  attr_reader :x
  def initialize(inner)
    @inner=inner
  end
  def x; @inner.x; end
  def ==(other)
    @inner.x==other.x
  end
end
a = A.new(o)  #o is just any object that allows o.x
b = A.new(o)
h = {a=>5}
p h[a] #5
p h[b] #nil, should be 5
p h[o] #nil, should be 5

I've tried ==, ===, eq? and hash all to no avail.

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1  
You might want to look into SimpleDelegator, if you want to delegate most methods to @inner. –  Marc-André Lafortune Jun 28 '12 at 15:01
    
Thanks @Marc-AndréLafortune! Learnt something new today –  alexloh Jun 28 '12 at 20:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Hash uses key.eql? to test keys for equality. If you need to use instances of your own classes as keys in a Hash, it is recommended that you define both the eql? and hash methods. The hash method must have the property that a.eql?(b) implies a.hash == b.hash.

So...

class A
  attr_reader :x
  def initialize(inner)
    @inner=inner
  end
  def x; @inner.x; end
  def ==(other)
    @inner.x==other.x
  end

  def eql?(other)
    self == other
  end

  def hash
    x.hash
  end
end
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Ah, so it uses both. Now that I think about it, makes sense to use hash to get the bucket then eql? for the actual test. I think it's the same in Java too –  alexloh Jun 28 '12 at 20:59

You must define eql? and hash.

The documentation of Hash was lacking but has been improved recently.

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