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I am imlementing a simple merge function and I have got stuck, as the compiler gives me errors that I cannot explain. Here is my merge function:

void merge(void *a, int beg, int middle, int end, int (*cmp)(const void*, const void*
{
  std::stack<void*> first;
  std::stack<void*> second;

  for(int i = beg; i < middle; i++) {
   first.push(a+i);
  }
  for(int i = middle; i < end; i++) {
    second.push(a+i);
  }

  for(int i = beg; i < end; i++) {
    if(first.empty()) {
      void *tmp = second.top();
      second.pop();
      a+i = tmp;
    } else if(second.empty()) {
      void *tmp = first.top();
      first.pop();
      a+i = tmp;
    } else if(cmp(first.top(), second.top())) {
      void *tmp = first.top();
      first.pop();
      a+i = tmp;
    } else {
      void *tmp = second.top();
      second.pop();
      a+i = tmp;
    }
  }
}

And here is the error:

sort.h: In function `void merge(void*, int, int, int, int (*)(const void*, const void*))':
sort.h:9: error: pointer of type `void *' used in arithmetic
sort.h:12: error: pointer of type `void *' used in arithmetic
sort.h:19: error: pointer of type `void *' used in arithmetic
sort.h:19: error: non-lvalue in assignment
sort.h:23: error: pointer of type `void *' used in arithmetic
sort.h:23: error: non-lvalue in assignment
sort.h:27: error: pointer of type `void *' used in arithmetic
sort.h:27: error: non-lvalue in assignment
sort.h:31: error: pointer of type `void *' used in arithmetic
sort.h:31: error: non-lvalue in assignment

Can anyone help me? TIA.

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8  
How to use void*? Simple answer: don't. For experts only: don't unless you really have to. –  Fanael Jun 28 '12 at 15:09
1  
Tough to avoid always when you are using something like pthreads though. –  BlackVegetable Jun 28 '12 at 15:10
    
@Fanael I totaly agree, but I do experiments, just to pass my time. –  Rontogiannis Aristofanis Jun 28 '12 at 15:10
    
@Fanael: Exactly. Unless you need to implement low level memory operations (like memcpy, memmov, memset) which you shouldn't be implementing yourself anyway (they're already there), don't use void*. If you do use them, wrap them far away in a happy little class or struct or something. –  Linuxios Jun 28 '12 at 15:11
1  
@BlackVegetable: So use the standard thread library instead. –  Mike Seymour Jun 28 '12 at 15:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Pointer arithmetic is not possible with void*, since void has no size, and pointer arithmetic requires to compute memory addresses based on the size of the type.

If you expect beg, middle and end to represent byte offsets, you should use char pointers instead (one char is one byte).

If you want to write a generic function, that works with any type, don't use void pointers but templates:

template <typename t>
void merge(T *a, int beg, int middle, int end, int (*cmp)(const T*, const T*))
{
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, but this is not what i'm seeking for. –  Rontogiannis Aristofanis Jun 28 '12 at 15:18
2  
@RondogiannisAristophanes: You are asking why you are getting compile errors and every answer he explains it to you. If this is not what you are looking for, you should consider rephrasing your question! –  Ferdinand Beyer Jun 28 '12 at 15:22
1  
In this case, why not use iterators instead of pointers and AnyFunc cmp instead of a function pointer? That would be truly generic. –  Fanael Jun 28 '12 at 15:23
1  
@FerdinandBeyer - you are correct, I was assuming the definition of a byte as 8 bits, but it seems that is historically incorrect (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byte) - the size of char is defined as the platform's "byte" and can be larger than 8 bits. Learned something today (and original comment removed). –  Joris Timmermans Jun 28 '12 at 15:27
    
@MadKeithV: +1 -- learning is what SO is all about. –  Ferdinand Beyer Jun 28 '12 at 16:45

In first.push(a+i);, you are trying to add an offset i to a void * pointer a. This is illegal.

You can add offsets to any other "something pointer", because that something will be defined and will have a defined size in memory. Therefore adding an offset of 1 will mean moving forward of sizeof(something) in memory. But void has no defined size. Therefore you cannot use offsets with void * pointers.

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It is not quite "any other something pointer" - if the something is an incomplete type it will still fail to compile because the correct size of the object cannot be determined. –  Joris Timmermans Jun 28 '12 at 15:19

The problem with void* is that it is an address without a type. When you ask for a+i you say "move i elements further" without specifying what kind of elements. Is it one byte, one int, one car, one house, or one continent?

In C++ you don't have to use this kind of stuff, you can use templates and let the compiler figure out how to handle different types.

template<class T>
void merge(T* a, etc.
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Function prototype probably should look something like this:

void merge(void **a, int beg, int middle, int end, int (*cmp)(const void*, const void*));

Then you can access every array member by its index without any problem.

Note: The size of object pointed by void is unknown as previously mentioned by Ferdinand (therefore a + i can't be applied), but the size of void* is known therefore updating prototype in a such way does the trick.

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I can tell you about one of your errors. You're trying to do pointer arithmetic on a void*. You see, when you add to a pointer, you are adding however many bytes there are in the type of the pointer. So, if you add to a void*, the compiler can't know how many bytes to add, as void* has no type. Therefore, if you want to do it at the byte level, cast to a char*, or any other pointer level you want. If you want to do things byte by byte, you can take a void*, but cast to char*.

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