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The program below prints the following data:

 Wed,Jun,13,10:37:34,2012,759,41,0,30,10,0,0,1
 Wed,Jun,13,10:38:34,2012,767,33,0,25,6,0,0,2
 Wed,Jun,13,10:39:34,2012,758,42,0,32,10,0,0,0
 Wed,Jun,13,10:40:35,2012,758,42,0,29,11,0,0,2
 Wed,Jun,13,10:41:35,2012,761,39,0,34,5,0,0,0
 Wed,Jun,13,10:42:35,2012,769,31,0,22,6,0,0,3
 Wed,Jun,13,10:43:35,2012,754,46,0,29,17,0,0,0

I need to output the max value (ex. 769) for each 5 minute interval. Ideally this would be 10:00:00 - 10:05:00, etc. Time is military time (24 hour). What is the best way of doing this? Please note that I am a beginner in Perl. Below is my code:

#!/usr/bin/perl

# This program displays the max thread count at 5 minute intervals and writes the lines to a CSV file.

use strict;
use warnings;
use diagnostics;

# Initialize functions
my @data;
my $line;
my @L1;
#my $outFivemin = "log_5min.csv";
#open (FiveMin, ">> $outFivemin");

# Open the error_log 
open(FH, "error_log");
@data = <FH>;

# Filter the results to MPMStats only
sub findLines {
    my @return = ();
    foreach $line (@data) {
        if ( ($line =~ /notice/) && ($line =~ /rdy/) ) {  
                $line =~ s/ /,/g;   
                my @L1 = split(/|notice|\[|,mpmstats:,|\t|rdy,|bsy,|rd,|wr,|ka,|log,|dns,|cls,/, $line);
                $line =~ s/|notice|\[|,mpmstats:,|\t|rdy,|bsy,|rd,|wr,|ka,|log,|dns,|cls,//g;                   
                push @return, join("", @L1);
        }
    }
    return @return;
}

# Initializers for my data
my($dayOfWeek1,$month1,$dayOfMonth1,$time,$year1,$rdy,$bsy,$rd,$wr,$ka,$log,$dns);
my($cls);

# Create a 2D array
my @L2 = &findLines;
foreach my $line (@L2){
    ($dayOfWeek1, $month1, $dayOfMonth1, $time, $year1, $rdy, $bsy, $rd, $wr, $ka, $log, $dns, $cls) = split(/,/, $line);
    print "$dayOfWeek1,$month1,$dayOfMonth1,$time,$year1,$rdy,$bsy,$rd,$wr,$ka,$log,$dns,$cls";
}
share|improve this question
    
Could you configure mpmstats to log each 5 minutes rather than 1? it could make you work easier –  Arcadien Jun 28 '12 at 15:24
    
That will not work as I need to find that max value every 5 minutes, not just the value at that 5 minute interval. –  rupes0610 Jun 28 '12 at 15:33
    
Initializers for my data -- no, don't do that. The my keyword has the special feature to create a lexical variable that is only visible in the current block. You should take advantage of that as often as you can: Only create variables within the block they will be used. –  TLP Jun 28 '12 at 15:47
    
what are "35,2012" and "34, 2012" - are they not data members? –  PinkElephantsOnParade Jun 28 '12 at 15:58
    
"Hour:Minute:Second", "Year". Yes they are but the highest value that I need is the 769-type number. –  rupes0610 Jun 28 '12 at 16:01

4 Answers 4

up vote -1 down vote accepted

This works(?), (didn't test), and it begins with your loop right after my @L2 = &findLines.

my %interval;
my %month;
@month{qw/ jan feb mar apr may jun jul aug sep oct nov dec /} = '01' .. '12';

# Create a 2D array 
my @L2 = &findLines;
foreach my $line (@L2){ 
    #($dayOfWeek1, $month1, $dayOfMonth1, $time, $year1, $rdy, $bsy, $rd, $wr, $ka, $log, $dns, $cls) = split(/,/, $line); 
    #print "$dayOfWeek1,$month1,$dayOfMonth1,$time,$year1,$rdy,$bsy,$rd,$wr,$ka,$log,$dns,$cls"; 
    my ($dow, $mon, $day, $hr, $min, $sec, $yr, $amt) = split /[:,]/, $line, 9;
    my $key = sprintf "%4d-%02d-%02d %02d:%02d",
                $yr, $month{lc $mon}, $day, $hr, int($min / 5) * 5;

    if (exists $interval{$key}) {
        if ($interval{$key}{amt} < $amt) {
            $interval{$key}{amt} = $amt;
            $interval{$key}{data} = [split ",", $line];
        }
    }
    else { # first time in this 5 minute interval
        $interval{$key}{amt} = $amt;
        $interval{$key}{data} = [split ",", $line];
    }
} 

my $csv = Text::CSV_XS->new ({ binary => 1 }) or
     die "Cannot use CSV: ".Text::CSV_XS->error_diag ();

$csv->eol ("\r\n");
open my $fh, ">", 'junk.csv' or die $!;

for my $time (sort keys %interval) {
    $csv->print($fh, $interval{$time}{data});
}

close $fh or die $!;

I hope this brings you closer to a good solution to your problem.
Update: added first field to split and changed from 8 to 9 portions.

share|improve this answer
    
Worked even better than the last! Only it does not output the cls column data (last column). Also, how do I go about pulling only the last 5 minute interval as well? I need to be able to put XML formatting around it. Thank you so very much for your help!!! –  rupes0610 Jun 29 '12 at 13:54
    
Wow, don't know why. Maybe its the line ending, $csv->eol ("\r\n");. This would be for a Windows computer I believe. If on a unix/linux, maybe that line should be: '$csv->eol ("\n");'. The line $interval{$key}{data} = [split ",", $line]; should include the last column, 'cls' when it splits the line. Sorry I can't be of more help. –  Chris Charley Jun 29 '12 at 15:03
    
Do you by chance know how to pull only the last 5 minute interval (row)? –  rupes0610 Jun 29 '12 at 15:05
    
Maybe these 2 lines: my $last_time = (sort keys %interval)[-1]; followed by print join ",", @{ $interval{$last_time} };. Give it a try :-) –  Chris Charley Jun 29 '12 at 15:27
    
Got the last column issue solved. The issue was that each string in the array needed another comma after the last value. It was splitting early for some reason without it. Your solution above is not working as I get the error: "Not an ARRAY reference". When I try to print the file within Eclipse, I get HASH(0x...) or ARRAY(0x...). Any ideas why I cannot print a value of a hash? –  rupes0610 Jun 29 '12 at 20:02

I suggest you manipulate the date/time in each record to supply a five-minute key, and maintain a maximum for each key.

For example, if a record starts Wed,Jun,13,10:37:34,2012 then an appropriate key is Jun 13 10:35 2012.

Ordinarily this would be a hash, but since it is likely that the output is wanted in chronological order, and extra work and modules are required to provide a sortable date/time string, the program below uses an array of pairs.

The program works by using a regex subtitution s/// on the time (fourth) field that replaces the minutes and seconds with the first two-digit minute preceding the time: the seconds are ignored and the minutes rounded down to a multiple of five.

A new [$range, $value] pair is pushed onto the @maxima array if the array is empty or if we are in a different $range. Otherwise the $value element of the latest pair is updated if we have found a new maximum.

Note that this program expects a log file name on the command line, and will default to error_log of none is provided.

use strict;
use warnings;

@ARGV = ('error_log') unless @ARGV;

my @maxima;

while (<>) {

  my @fields = /([^,\s]+)/g;
  next unless @fields;
  $fields[3] =~ s|(\d+):\d\d$|5*int($1/5)|e;

  my $range = join ' ', @fields[1..4];
  my $value = $fields[5];

  if (@maxima == 0 or $range ne $maxima[-1][0]) {
    push @maxima, [$range, $value];
  }
  else {
    $maxima[-1][1] = $value if $maxima[-1][1] < $value;
  }
}

for (@maxima) {
  printf "Maximum for five minutes starting %s is %d\n", @$_;
}

output

Maximum for five minutes starting Jun 13 10:35 2012 is 767
Maximum for five minutes starting Jun 13 10:40 2012 is 769

Update

Now that I understand you want the entire record containing the maximum value of field 6 for each five-minute period I have written this revised code.

It also works from the contents of your @L2 array instead of reading from a file.

I am certain this would be far better coded to read from the file in a while loop and generate the output directly from there, but unless you show us some log file data I cannot suggest a better alternative than this.

This program continues from the point where you populate @L2 in your own program.

my @L2 = findLines();

my @maxima;

for my $record (@L2) {

  my @fields = $record =~ /([^,\s]+)/g;
  next unless @fields;

  my @range = @fields[1..4];
  $range[2] =~ s|(\d+):\d\d$|5*int($1/5)|e;
  my $range = join ' ', @range;
  my $value = $fields[5];

  if (@maxima == 0 or $range ne $maxima[-1][0]) {
    push @maxima, [$range, $value, $record];
  }
  else {
    @{$maxima[-1]}[1,2] = ($value, $record) if $maxima[-1][1] < $value;
  }
}

print $_->[2] for @maxima;

output

 Wed,Jun,13,10:38:34,2012,767,33,0,25,6,0,0,2
 Wed,Jun,13,10:42:35,2012,769,31,0,22,6,0,0,3
share|improve this answer
    
This worked perfectly. Thank you so much!! –  rupes0610 Jun 28 '12 at 16:52
    
@user1488984: I am surprised, given my comment on your sample code. But you are more than welcome. –  Borodin Jun 28 '12 at 16:53
    
is there any way to list the remiaining values for that line as well? ex.Wed,Jun,13,10:38:34,2012,767,33,0,25,6,0,0,2 –  rupes0610 Jun 28 '12 at 20:49
    
@user1488984: now that I understand better what you require I have updated my answer to give an alternative solution. Note that your whole program really requires tidying up but you need to show your source data for us to help with that. –  Borodin Jul 1 '12 at 12:03
    
So close to done! Is there any way to print the 5 minute interval instead of the exact timestamp? Also, how do I put this content into an array so that I can export to a CSV file? Thanks again. –  rupes0610 Jul 6 '12 at 13:20

Something along these lines should do the trick...

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

# Somewhere to store the data
my %data;

# Process the input a line at a time
while (<DATA>) {
  # Split the input line on commas and colons.
  # Assign the bits we need to variables.
  my ($mon,$day,$hr,$min,$sec,$yr,$val) = (split /[,:]/)[1 .. 7];

  # Normalise the minute value to five-minute increments
  # i.e 37 becomes 35, 42 becomes 40
  $min = int($min / 5) * 5;

  # Create push the value onto an array that is stored in %data using
  # a key generated from the timestamp.
  # Note that we use the 5-min normalised value of the minute so that
  # all values from the same five minute period end up in the same array.
  push @{$data{"$yr-$mon-$day $hr:$min"}}, $val;
}

# For each key in the array (i.e. each five minute increment...
foreach (sort keys %data) {
  # ... sort the array numerically and grab the last element
  # (which will be the largest)
  my $max = (sort { $a <=> $b } @{$data{$_}})[-1];
  # Say something useful
  say "$_ - $max";
}

__DATA__
Wed,Jun,13,10:37:34,2012,759,41,0,30,10,0,0,1
Wed,Jun,13,10:38:34,2012,767,33,0,25,6,0,0,2
Wed,Jun,13,10:39:34,2012,758,42,0,32,10,0,0,0
Wed,Jun,13,10:40:35,2012,758,42,0,29,11,0,0,2
Wed,Jun,13,10:41:35,2012,761,39,0,34,5,0,0,0
Wed,Jun,13,10:42:35,2012,769,31,0,22,6,0,0,3
Wed,Jun,13,10:43:35,2012,754,46,0,29,17,0,0,0
share|improve this answer
1  
This will display the results in a very unnatural order, putting 2012-Dec-25 00:00 before 2012-Jul-04 00:00. –  Borodin Jun 28 '12 at 16:41
    
Yeah, I know. Fixing that is left as an exercise for the reader :-) –  Dave Cross Jun 28 '12 at 19:22
    
that's very lame. A proper solution involves discarding your code and starting again. –  Borodin Jun 28 '12 at 22:12

Whoops, I mistakenly thought that your csv output was the data file being parsed.

Ignore the answer below.

Here is a solution that prints out the original comma separated line. The max value and the time are also available for printing. But I created a comma separated file with the results instead. :-)

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Text::CSV_XS;

my %interval;
my $csv = Text::CSV_XS->new ({ binary => 1 }) or
     die "Cannot use CSV: ".Text::CSV_XS->error_diag ();

open my $fh, "<", "o33.txt" or die "o33.txt: $!";
while (my $row = $csv->getline ($fh)) {
    my ($time, $amt) = @$row[3,5];
    my ($hr, $min) = split /:/, $time;
    my $key = sprintf "%02d:%02d", $hr, int($min/5) * 5;

    if (exists $interval{$key}) {
        if ($interval{$key}{amt} < $amt) {
            $interval{$key}{amt} = $amt;
            $interval{$key}{data} = $row;
        }
    }
    else { # first time in this 5 minute interval
        $interval{$key}{amt} = $amt;
        $interval{$key}{data} = $row;
    }
}
$csv->eof or $csv->error_diag ();
close $fh or die $!;;


$csv->eol ("\r\n");
open $fh, ">", 'junk.csv' or die $!;

for my $time (sort keys %interval) {
    $csv->print($fh, $interval{$time}{data});
}

close $fh or die $!;

The output to 'junk.csv' is:

Wed,Jun,13,10:38:34,2012,767,33,0,25,6,0,0,2
Wed,Jun,13,10:42:35,2012,769,31,0,22,6,0,0,3
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! But I'm getting the following errors: Use of uninitialized value $time in split Use of uninitialized value $min in division Use of uninitialized value $hr in sprintf Use of uninitialized value $amt in numeric lt (<) Use of uninitialized value in numeric lt (<) –  rupes0610 Jun 29 '12 at 1:26
    
@user1488984 Sorry, it ran on your sample file here ok. I'm posting another solution that ties right in with your code that produced the original output. The only thing about it is I have no way of testing it because only you have the data you pulled it out of. –  Chris Charley Jun 29 '12 at 2:25

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