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I am relatively new to OOP so I am not sure about the terminology.

I have created a DOM element as a field of an object (eg myObject.myElement) and I appended the element to the document. The object has a .mousemove() event attached (using jQuery). I want to be able to select the object (myObject) for whom the selected element (myElement) is a field so that I can access other fields of the object. There is more than one object and the event handler is the same for elements of different objects. Is it possible to select the parent object of the element? Do I need to give the element the same fields so that I can access the same data?

I want to be able to do something like this but maybe it is not that straightforward:

$('.bubble').on({mousemove: function () {
    parentObject = this.parentObject();
    alert(parentObject.otherDataField);
});

The element was created like this:

function bubbleObject(value)
{
    this.value = value;
    this.element = document.createElement('div');
    $(this.element).appendTo('.bubbles');
}

myFirstBubble = new bubbleObject(10);
mySecondBubble = new bubbleObject(100);

and I need to be able to access the value field for the object (I am making it simpler as the code is pretty long and mostly irrelevant to my issue).

Do I need to do this:

function bubbleObject(value)
{
    this.value = value;
    this.element = document.createElement('div');
    $(this.element).appendTo('.bubbles');
    this.element.value = value; // add same value to element
}

or is there a better way?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A back reference to the parent could be better than copying values:

function bubbleObject(value)
{
    this.value = value;
    this.element = document.createElement('div');
    $(this.element).appendTo('.bubbles');
    this.element.parent = this;
}

However, using this way you have to use element.parent.value instead.

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is this the only way then? –  Josh Bambrick Jun 28 '12 at 16:19
    
What exactely is the problem with this approach? I think it is only one additional reference, so there shouldn't be any performance or memory issues. –  Sebastian vom Meer Jun 28 '12 at 18:08
    
There's no problem with the approach but if there was a way of selecting the parent with a method (like I suggested in the question) that would be more intuitive and, I imagine, conventional. If not, then what you suggested is perfectly good. –  Josh Bambrick Jun 28 '12 at 20:31
    
I see your point. Your parent method needs to know which element belongs to which object. Therefore your method needs some kind of map (which is much more overhead) or you have to scan all your objects if they contain a specific element (which should lead to very bad performance). As I said: One more reference in not expensive. It's just a pointer, not a copy or something. –  Sebastian vom Meer Jun 29 '12 at 10:10

Another approach (as I mentioned before) is to scan all element-containing objects if they contain a specific element. If you don't have all these objects in an array you have to scan all window components (as I said, this is expensive):

function findElement(element) {
  for (obj in window) {
    if (typeof obj === 'object' && obj.myElement == element) {
      return obj;
    }
  }
  return null;
}

This is just an untested draft. And it would be so much better if you have a list of parent objects which you can use instead of window.

function findElement(element) {
  for (int i = 0, l = objList.length; i < l; i++) {
    if (typeof objList[i] === 'object' && objList[i].myElement == element) {
      return objList[i];
    }
  }
  return null;
}
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