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Python Property Change Listener Pattern

I am newbie programmer. In my program I want to continuously check if any changes are made to a dictionary. If there are changes made to the dictionary than I need to run some methods related only to the changes.Can someone explain me various techniques that can be used with code examples to accomplish it.

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marked as duplicate by casperOne Jun 29 '12 at 17:02

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You could derive from dict, overwrite all mutating methods (there are about ten of them) and catch the changes they make. However, there is probably a much easier solution to the problem you are trying to solve. So what exactly is this problem? –  Sven Marnach Jun 28 '12 at 15:26
    
What would be changing the dictionary? –  exfizik Jun 28 '12 at 15:26
    
What is changing the dict? Why not have that code signal to you that the dict is changed? –  Ned Batchelder Jun 28 '12 at 15:26
    
can you show us what have you tried? Can you show us part of the code? like the dictionary initialization/structure, the class/method need to be called. –  KurzedMetal Jun 28 '12 at 15:27
    
If you're only adding to the end of your dictionary, you could keep a size variable, and check the size of the dictionary every so often. If it changes, you know from looking at the previous size and the new size which changes are new? –  adchilds Jun 28 '12 at 15:32
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1 Answer 1

There are two general approaches "push" and "poll":

  • "push": your dictionary generates an event/calls a callback on any change to itself e.g., traits library. It is useful when you need to act on any change as soon as it happens.
  • "poll": you inspect the dictionary for changes when you're ready to act on them. It is useful if the changes could be processed in a batch mode and you're are not interested in individual changes only the final state matters.
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Thank you everyone for the reply and time. –  user1488987 Jul 1 '12 at 3:34
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