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I have the following code:

        public void Dispose()
        {
            bool append = true;
            using(var log = new System.IO.StreamWriter("log.txt", append))
            {
                log.WriteLine("Disposing");
                log.Flush();
            }
        }

So there's the risk that the StreamWriter may throw an exception, would that then mean that my object would not get disposed? Would simply wrapping this in a Try/Catch solve the issue?

Thanks.

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1  
I'm not confident enough with this answer to post in the answers box, but I believe that your object will get disposed anyway as any managed object would, just that the rest of your dispose method won't run. –  Sam I am Jun 28 '12 at 16:27
    
what are you trying to achieve? Dispose/IDisposable is used for releasing unmanaged resources which are missing in the Dispose method. Only logging is done –  Tilak Jun 28 '12 at 16:31
    
It's just an example of a case where an error could occur inside the Dispose, and this is how the question was put to me in an interview, so hence how I posted it. –  Richard Jun 28 '12 at 16:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It depends on what you mean by this:

would that then mean that my object would not get disposed?

Your object has had Dispose called on it, otherwise it wouldn't have reached the StreamWriter code. That Dispose call may not have completed, but it's not like there's some magical flag on an object saying "disposed or not disposed".

Note that disposal is logically separate from garbage collection and finalization: your object will still become eligible for garbage collection in the same way as normal (when there are no live references) and if you have a finalizer (almost certainly not a good idea) it will still be called if you haven't suppressed it.

It's important to understand that although C# has support for IDisposable at the language level, the CLR really doesn't care about it. It's just another interface, and Dispose is just another method.

In general it's a bad idea for Dispose to throw an exception (as if an object is disposed as part of cleaning up an existing failing operation, you end up losing the original exception) but it's not going to fundamentally damage the CLR in some way.

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Unless it's being called by the finalizer, right? –  Jeff Yates Jun 28 '12 at 16:41

So there's the risk that the StreamWriter may throw an exception, would that then mean that my object would not get disposed? Would simply wrapping this in a Try/Catch solve the issue?

If StreamWriter will throw exception, only side effect will be that following will not execute.

 log.WriteLine("Disposing");
 log.Flush();

Rest everything will be as expected. StreamWriter will be disposed properly as well. (That is the purpose of using keyword)

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Well the StreamWriter won't be disposed if the constructor throws an exception - the calling code would have nothing to dispose. But hopefully in that case it would already have cleared up any resources it had got as far as allocating. –  Jon Skeet Jun 28 '12 at 16:35
    
i am aware, but as you have mentioned, there is nothing to dispose then. I should have been explicit though. –  Tilak Jun 28 '12 at 16:43

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