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Due to a bug in my javascript click handling, multiple Location objects are posted to a JSON array that is sent to the server. I think I know how to fix that bug, but I'd also like to implement a server side database duplicate erase function. However, I'm not sure how to write this query.

The only affected table is laid out as

+----+------------+--------+
| ID | locationID | linkID |
+----+------------+--------+
| 64 |         13 |     14 |
| 65 |         14 |     13 |
| 66 |         14 |     15 |
| 67 |         15 |     14 |
| 68 |         15 |     16 |
| 69 |         16 |     17 |
| 70 |         16 |     14 |
| 71 |         17 |     16 |
| 72 |         17 |     16 |
| 73 |         17 |     16 |
| 74 |         17 |     16 |
| 75 |         17 |     16 |
| 76 |         17 |     16 |
| 77 |         17 |     16 |
+----+------------+--------+

As you can see, I have multiple pairs of (17, 16), while 14 has two pairs of (14, 13) and (14, 15). How can I delete all but one record of any duplicate entries?

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there are many answers already on SO... –  Fahim Parkar Jun 28 '12 at 17:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Don't implement post factum correction logic, put a unique index on the fields that need to be unique, that way the database will stop dupe inserts before it's too late.

If you're using MySQL 5.1 or higher you can remove dupes and create a unique index in 1 command:

ALTER IGNORE TABLE 'YOURTABLE' 
ADD UNIQUE INDEX somefancynamefortheindex (locationID, linkID)
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And leave the bad data he already has in there...? –  Eric J. Jun 28 '12 at 16:43
    
@Eric, He's got a unique ID for that, I think he is asking about the new prevention. –  user1166147 Jun 28 '12 at 16:44
    
@EricJ. see edit –  fvu Jun 28 '12 at 16:47
    
Unique constraints won't work here, since LocationID and LinkID have a many to many relationship. Will that command respect these conditions? –  Jason Jun 28 '12 at 16:49
    
@Jason the key will enforce uniqueness of a locationID + linkID pair as a whole, not the uniqueness of each of those fields –  fvu Jun 28 '12 at 16:51

You can create a temporary table where you can store the distinct records and then truncate the original table and insert data from temp table.

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE temp_table (locationId INT,linkID INT) 

INSERT INTO temp_table (locationId,linkId) SELECT DISTINCT locationId,linkId FROM table1;

DELETE from table1;

INSERT INTO table1 (locationId,linkId) SELECT * FROM temp_table ;
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2  
DROP table1 + rename TEMP_TABLE is a whole lot faster than truncate and copy –  fvu Jun 28 '12 at 16:58
delete from tbl
using tbl,tbl t2
where tbl.locationID=t2.locationID
  and tbl.linkID=t2.linkID
  and tbl.ID>t2.ID
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I am assuming you don't mean for the clean up, but for the new check? Put a unique index on if possible, if you don't have control of the DB do an upsert and check for nulls instead of an insert.

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