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Is the time complexity of the Oracle MAX function O(1), O(log n) or O(n) with respect to the number of rows in a table?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you have a B-tree index on the column then finding the maximum value is O(log(n)) because the answer will be the last (or first) row of the index. Values are stored in the deepest nodes of the B-tree which has a height O(log(n)).

Without an index it is O(n) because all rows must be read to determine the maximum value.


Note: The O(n) notation ignores constants but in the real world these constants cannot be ignored. The difference between reading from disk and reading from memory is several orders of magnitude. Accessing the first value of an index is likely to be performed mostly in RAM, whereas a full table scan of a huge table will need to read mostly from disk.

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Do you know a reference to an Oracle document, which describes this? –  ceving Jun 28 '12 at 17:04
    
This answer states, that MAX is O(log n), but no reference either. –  ceving Jun 28 '12 at 17:13
1  
@ceving: Actually I'm thinking about it, and accessing the first row of an index is O(log(n)) time because this will be in a node that is x levels deep in a B-tree where x is O(log(n)). But since x is a very small number, it really doesn't matter. –  Mark Byers Jun 28 '12 at 17:14

Realistically, it's hard to say without specifying a query, a table definition, and a query plan.

If you have a table that has no index on the column you're computing the MAX on, Oracle will have to do a full table scan. That is going to be O(n) since you've got to scan every block in the table. You can see that by looking at the query plan.

We'll generate a table with 100,000 rows and ensure that the rows are reasonably large using a CHAR(1000) column

SQL> create table foo( col1 number, col2 char(1000) );

Table created.

SQL> insert into foo
  2    select level, lpad('a',1000)
  3      from dual
  4   connect by level <= 100000;

100000 rows created.

Now, we can look at the plan for the basic MAX operation. This is doing a full table scan (an O(n) operation)

SQL> set autotrace on;
SQL> select max(col1)
  2    from foo;

 MAX(COL1)
----------
    100000


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 1342139204

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation          | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT   |      |     1 |    13 |  4127   (1)| 00:00:50 |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE    |      |     1 |    13 |            |          |
|   2 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL| FOO  |   106K|  1350K|  4127   (1)| 00:00:50 |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note
-----
   - dynamic sampling used for this statement (level=2)


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
         29  recursive calls
          1  db block gets
      14686  consistent gets
          0  physical reads
        176  redo size
        527  bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
        523  bytes received via SQL*Net from client
          2  SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
          0  sorts (memory)
          0  sorts (disk)
          1  rows processed

If you create an index on the column you're computing the MAX of, Oracle can do a MIN/MAX scan on the index. That is an O(log n) operation if that's the plan the optimizer chooses. Of course, as a practical matter, this is functionally an O(1) operation because the height of an index is never realistically going to exceed 4 or 5-- the constant terms here are going to dominate.

SQL> create index idx_foo_col1
  2      on foo( col1 );

Index created.

SQL> select max(col1)
  2    from foo;

 MAX(COL1)
----------
    100000


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 817909383

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                  | Name         | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT           |              |     1 |    13 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE            |              |     1 |    13 |            |          |
|   2 |   INDEX FULL SCAN (MIN/MAX)| IDX_FOO_COL1 |     1 |    13 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note
-----
   - dynamic sampling used for this statement (level=2)

Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
          5  recursive calls
          0  db block gets
         83  consistent gets
          1  physical reads
          0  redo size
        527  bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
        523  bytes received via SQL*Net from client
          2  SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
          0  sorts (memory)
          0  sorts (disk)
          1  rows processed

But then things get harder. Both MIN and MAX have the same O(log n) behavior individually. But if you have both MIN and MAX in the same query, suddenly you're back to an O(n) operation. Oracle (as of 11.2) hasn't implemented an option grab both the first block and the last block of an index

SQL> ed
Wrote file afiedt.buf

  1  select min(col1), max(col1)
  2*   from foo
SQL> /

 MIN(COL1)  MAX(COL1)
---------- ----------
         1     100000


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 1342139204

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation          | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT   |      |     1 |    13 |  4127   (1)| 00:00:50 |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE    |      |     1 |    13 |            |          |
|   2 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL| FOO  |   106K|  1350K|  4127   (1)| 00:00:50 |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note
-----
   - dynamic sampling used for this statement (level=2)


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
          4  recursive calls
          0  db block gets
      14542  consistent gets
          0  physical reads
          0  redo size
        601  bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
        523  bytes received via SQL*Net from client
          2  SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
          0  sorts (memory)
          0  sorts (disk)
          1  rows processed

Of course, in subsequent versions of Oracle, this optimization might be implemented and this would go back to being an O(log n) operation. Of course, you can also rewrite the query to get a different query plan that goes back to being O(log n)

SQL> ed
Wrote file afiedt.buf

  1  select (select min(col1) from foo) min,
  2         (select max(col1) from foo) max
  3*   from dual
SQL>
SQL> /

       MIN        MAX
---------- ----------
         1     100000


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 3561244922

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                  | Name         | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT           |              |     1 |       |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE            |              |     1 |    13 |            |          |
|   2 |   INDEX FULL SCAN (MIN/MAX)| IDX_FOO_COL1 |     1 |    13 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   3 |  SORT AGGREGATE            |              |     1 |    13 |            |          |
|   4 |   INDEX FULL SCAN (MIN/MAX)| IDX_FOO_COL1 |     1 |    13 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   5 |  FAST DUAL                 |              |     1 |       |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Note
-----
   - dynamic sampling used for this statement (level=2)


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
          7  recursive calls
          0  db block gets
        166  consistent gets
          0  physical reads
          0  redo size
        589  bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
        523  bytes received via SQL*Net from client
          2  SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
          0  sorts (memory)
          0  sorts (disk)
          1  rows processed
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How do I have to read the execution plan? Where can I find the complexity? –  ceving Jun 29 '12 at 11:38
    
@ceving - The execution plans show you how Oracle chose to execute a particular query. When you see something like TABLE ACCESS FULL, that means that Oracle has to access every block of the table so that's going to be O(n). When you see INDEX FULL SCAN (MIN/MAX), that means that Oracle has to access the first (or last) block of an index so that's going to be O(log n). –  Justin Cave Jun 29 '12 at 14:58

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