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I am trying to move as much processing out of the UI thread on my Windows Phone app. I have some code that is being executed when I click on a button. The code is conceptually similar to the code below.

private int Processing(int a, int b, int c) { 
   this.A = this.moreProcessing(a);
   this.B = this.moreProcessing(b);
   this.C = this.moreProcessing(c);

   int newInt = /* ... */
   return newInt;
}

public void Button_Click(object sender, EventArgs args) {
   var result = Processing(1, 2, 3);
   this.MyTextBox.Content = result;
}

That would be very easy to move the execution on that code on a thread if the Processing method wasn't setting/getting global state variables.

How do I make sure that only one thread at a time is running in the right sequence? Right now it is easy since the processing code runs on the UI thread. The nice thing about the UI thread is that it guarantee me that everything runs in the right order and one at a time. How do I replicate that with threads?

I could refactor the entire code to have almost no global state, but cannot necessarily do that right now. I could also use lock, but I am just wondering if there's a better way. The processing I am doing isn't super heavy. However, I sometime see some lag in the UI and I want to keep the UI thread as free as possible.

Thanks!

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3 Answers

There are a few approaches.

If you intend to fire up a new thread for every Button_Click event, then indeed you could have multiple threads that wish to write to the same variables. You can solve that by wrapping the access to those variables in a lock statement.

Alternatively, you could have one thread always running dedicated to the Processing thread. Use a BlockingCollection to communicate between the UI thread and the Processing thread. Whenever a Button_Click happens, place the relevant info on the BlockingCollection, and have the Processing thread pull work items off of that BlockingCollection.

Untested code that should be close to OK:

class ProcessingParams // Or use a Tuple<int, int, int>
{
    public int A { get; set; }
    public int B { get; set; }
    public int C { get; set; }
}

BlockingCollection<int> bc = new BlockingCollection<int>();

private int Processing() { 

    try
    {
        while (true) 
        {
            ProcesingParams params = bc.Take();         
           this.A = this.moreProcessing(params.A);
           this.B = this.moreProcessing(params.B);
           this.C = this.moreProcessing(params.C);

           int newInt = /* ... */
           return newInt; // Rather than 'return' the int,  place it in this.MyTextBox.Content using thread marshalling
        }
    }
    catch (InvalidOperationException)
    {
        // IOE means that Take() was called on a completed collection
    }
}

public void Button_Click(object sender, EventArgs args) {
   //var result = Processing(1, 2, 3);
   bc.Add (new ProcessingParams() { A = 1, B = 2, C = 3 };
   //this.MyTextBox.Content = result;
}

When your application closes down, remember to call

bc.CompleteAdding(); // Causes the processing thread to end
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Great solution! But Windows Phone doesn't have BlockingCollection. :( –  Martin Jun 28 '12 at 18:16
    
Well that sucks! However, it's fairly straightforward to implement a producer/consumer queue using older threading constructs in .NET. There's a detailed walkthrough here albahari.com/threading/… or a more flexible version here albahari.com/threading/… Also, I recommend the whole eBook on Threading (my go-to resource) albahari.com/threading –  Eric J. Jun 28 '12 at 18:24
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A very simple solution is to use a BackgroundWorker. It allows you to offload your work to a background thread and notify you when it is complete. (see below for another option)

void Button_Click(object sender, EventArgs args)
{
    BackgroundWorker worker = new BackgroundWorker();
    worker.DoWork += (s, e) =>
                     {
                         e.Result = Processing(1, 2, 3);
                     };
    worker.RunWorkerCompleted += (s1, e1) =>
                                 {
                                     MyTextBox.Content = e1.Result;
                                     MyButton.IsEnabled = true;
                                 };

    // Disable the button to stop multiple clicks
    MyButton.IsEnabled = false;
    worker.RunWorkerAsync();
}

Another option is to get your code ready for the next version of Windows Phone and start using the Task Parallel Library. TPL is available with .Net4, but is not available with Windows Phone. There are some NuGet packages that do support Silverlight and Windows Phone. Add one of these packages to your project and you can change your code to (syntax may not be 100% correct):

private Task<int> ProcessAsync(int a, int b, int c)
{
    var taskCompletionSource = new TaskCompletionSource<int>();

    var task = Task.Factory.StartNew<int>(() =>
    {
        // Do your work

        return newInt;
    }
    task.ContinueWith(t => taskCompletionSource.SetResult(t.Result));
    return taskCompletionSource.Task;
}

void Button_Click(object sender, EventArgs args)
{
    // Disable the button to prevent more clicks
    MyButton.IsEnabled = false;

    var task = ProcessAsync(1,2,3);
    task.ContinueWith(t => 
        {
             MyTextBox.Content = t.Result;
             MyButton.IsEnabled = true;
        });
}
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Nice sample. So, i can use ContinueWith for calling async from non-await functions (like events)? –  Vitalii Vasylenko Oct 22 '13 at 6:04
    
You can use either. Events can be async methods and can await calls. You just need to be careful b/c now you have an async void method which is dangerous. Ensure that you always wrap the await call in a try/catch. Keep in mind this answer is almost 1 1/2 years old –  Shawn Kendrot Oct 22 '13 at 16:43
    
So, are there some improvements there. I know, that i can't expect event to wait for async (for example, if i have some async init inside of ApplicationLaunching(), phone would not wait for that). But if i have ProcessAsync and ContinueWith, and i'm calling rising new event inside, or hide splashscreen - then it should be ok? –  Vitalii Vasylenko Oct 22 '13 at 16:48
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Try this:

public void Button_Click(object sender, EventArgs args)
{
    Button.Enabled = false;

    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(new WaitCallback(BackgroundProcessing));
}

private void BackgroundProcessing(object state)
{
    var result = Processing(1, 2, 3);

    // Call back to UI thread with results
    Invoke(new Action(() => { 
        this.MyTextBox.Content = result;
        Button.Enabled = true;
     }));
}

private int Processing(int a, int b, int c)
{ 
   this.A = this.moreProcessing(a);
   this.B = this.moreProcessing(b);
   this.C = this.moreProcessing(c);

   int newInt = /* ... */
   return newInt;
}
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What if the user goes "click click click" faster than Processing can finish work? –  Eric J. Jun 28 '12 at 17:43
    
You need to disable your button before firing off the background thread. Button.Enabled = false. Where you set the MyTextBox.Content, you can re-enable it. I updated the code. –  Mangist Jun 28 '12 at 17:46
    
While that enhances the user experience (it's a good thing), I would not rely on the UI state for thread safety of background workers. One day someone will add a menu to do the same thing the button does today. Separate concerns. Have the UI code be responsible for managing presentation to the user, and the Processing code be responsible for doing its work in a thread-safe manner. –  Eric J. Jun 28 '12 at 17:52
    
Then use a controller, MVC or MVP is out of the scope of this question. –  Mangist Jun 28 '12 at 17:55
    
I'm not saying MVC. I'm saying program the thread code so that it's thread-safe no matter what the UI code does. –  Eric J. Jun 28 '12 at 18:25
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