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In what order to the method calls happen in a windows service? We are having a timing issue and I think it is due to the constructor taking too long to complete processing.

This is a similar issue that I think we are having Error 1053 the service did not respond to the start or control request

However, we are wonder in what order and when the methods Main, OnStart, InitializeComponent etc get called and/or when they should be called.

As well, would the OnStart method be the best place to put all of the processing?

**Solution

Made some time to make a test service and tested the responses below and found out the time out is coming from the Main method processing as well as the constructor being called in the Main method causing it to time out. Moving everything to the OnStart as well as just spinning off a thread seemed to work. Details here. http://www.adamthings.com/post/2012/06/28/error-1053-the-service-did-not-respond-to-the-start-or-control-request-in-a-timely-fashion/

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OnStart should start another thread which handles all your processing, so the method can return immediately. In my experience this works best. I wouldn't put anything in InitializeComponent. –  Mangist Jun 28 '12 at 17:49
    
OnStop should abort the thread, and wait for it to complete :) –  Mangist Jun 28 '12 at 17:49
1  
You can find out by placing breakpoints. –  usr Jun 28 '12 at 17:51
    
Marked both as right answers (if I could). Here is a blog post commenting on what I found. Both seemed to work well. adamthings.com/post/2012/06/28/… –  Adam Jun 19 '13 at 22:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Do not block in the OnStart() method. It sounds like you are doing this.

Create a separate thread in the OnStart() method and get out of there.

I haven't tested this, but something similar to:

protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
{
    var worker = new Thread(DoWork);
    worker.IsBackground = false;
    worker.Start();

    base.OnStart(args);
}

private void DoWork()
{
    while (!_stopRequested)  // (set this flag in the OnStop() method)
    {
        // processing goes here
    }
}

To answer your question about the order of events, just setup Trace statements in each method. I'm not sure how helpful that will be. The message (The service did not respond to the start request ...) you are getting is indicative of blocking (or taking too long) in a method that should execute relatively quickly.

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This was a great help in getting my thoughts moving. Thank you for the response. Posted my findings in the comments on the original post. –  Adam Jun 28 '12 at 21:15

I believe that the order is

As to where to put your code, I would suggest putting any code that can be cached in the Main, and any code that recycles on each start inside OnStart. However, you should not do any actual processing in OnStart, just initialization. Use a separate thread to do the bulk of your logic.

Also, the MSDN is helpful with this

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Thank you for the response, it was helpful. Posted my findings in the comments on the original post. –  Adam Jun 28 '12 at 21:15

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