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I am following the guide at this site and trying to exclude databases with the name turnkey in them.

find /var/lib/mysql -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -type d | cut -d'/' -f5 | grep -v ^mysql\$ | tr \\\r\\\n ,\ `

this command returns all the database names, how can I remove the turnkey ones?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The command you show is a Linux / unix shell command. If you add another step

 grep -v turnkey

you will omit any lines with the word "turnkey" in them.

Like so:

find /var/lib/mysql -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -type d | 
cut -d'/' -f5 | 
grep -v ^mysql\$ |
grep -v turnkey 
tr \\\r\\\n ,\ `

You didn't ask if this is a good idea. I don't think it is, because it relies on a particular ondisk structure for the MySQL server daemon software that is not part of the formal specification of the system. In other words, it could change.

You could do this:

SELECT SCHEMA_NAME FROM `information_schema`.`SCHEMATA` 
 WHERE SCHEMA_NAME NOT LIKE '%turnkey%'
 ORDER BY SCHEMA_NAME
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I appreciate this because I was going by that tutorial, and didn't even consider thinking outside their tutorial, shame on me for not doing it with mysql -e "....", wow thank you! –  Toby Joiner Jun 28 '12 at 20:22

You can use a little improved script without any additional utilities, just pure find:

find /var/lib/mysql -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -type d ! \( -name turnkey -or -name mysql \) -printf "%f "

Or just modify your variant to add turnkey in grep -v statement to exclude it from the list:

find /var/lib/mysql -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -type d | cut -d'/' -f5 | grep -v "^mysql\$\|^turnkey$" | tr \\\r\\\n ,\ `
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