Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Im trying to add a class to a each element in a collection. I want add a classs to the elemnt then wait a sec or two then add the class to the next one in the collection.

But when I use this code it just adds the class to each one at once.

for (var i = 0; i < article.length; i++) {
    setTimeout(function () {
        $(article[i]).addClass('something';
        }, 10000);
    }
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that you are setting a bunch of timeouts 10 seconds from the same moment in time, so they will all execute 10 seconds later at once. You need to chain them together so that each timeout handler invokes the next timeout:

var i = 0;
var callback;

callback = function () {
    if (i < article.length) {
        $(article[i]).addClass('something');

        ++i;
        setTimeout(callback, 10000);
    }
};

setTimeout(callback, 10000);
share|improve this answer
    
Is their a way to reverse the effect? So removeClass starting with the last? Thanks. –  mtwallet Sep 10 '13 at 12:00
    
@mtwallet Yes, use var i = article.length - 1; instead, for the condition use i >= 0 instead of i < article.length, use removeClass() instead of addClass(), and do --i instead of ++i. –  cdhowie Sep 10 '13 at 20:56
    
Thanks for the help, I appreciate it –  mtwallet Sep 11 '13 at 9:00

Try something like this:

 (function step(i){         
     if( i < article.length ){
          $(article[i]).addClass('some_class');
          setTimeout(function(){ step(i+1) },10000);
     }         
 })(0);
share|improve this answer
    
You can retain the elegance without cheating (not indenting function) by using $.proxy( step, null, i+1 ) :P –  Esailija Jun 28 '12 at 18:22
    
@Esailija I don't think,that it is more elegant with $.proxy. ) –  Engineer Jun 28 '12 at 18:26

You can use

var x = setInterval("javascript",ms);

and it wall call whatever is in the code section over and over again every "ms" until you call the

clearInterval(x);

function

share|improve this answer

An approach without having to chain calls:

for (var i = 0; i < article.length; i++) {
    (function(_i) {
    setTimeout(function () {
        $(article[_i]).addClass('something');
    }, 10000+_i*1000);
    })(i);
}

It's pretty unlikely the overhead from adding a CSS class will be significant enough to make this not behave as desired.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.